Category:
Toys

Belly Bongo

From the mind of inventor George Fullerton came, in 1973, the Belly Bongo.



It's called a "Belly Bongo," and according to inventor Fullerton, it will make you "shake, rattle and roll." Made of high-impact styrene plastic, the Belly Bongo toy is an 8-inch square composed of four open-ended chambers. A hard rubber ball hangs from a three-inch string on the front-center. A canvas strap threaded through the back fastens it to your body. When Belly Bongo is secured around the hips — "where the action is," says Fullerton — the ball moves with the motion of your body. As it hits on the hollow chambers, it produces a bongo-beat, the tone of which varies according to the chamber size. With the motion of walking, the Belly Bongo emits a bump-da-da-da, bump-da-da-da beat. "It tells you how sexy your walk is," Fullerton grins.

A rapid-motion twist produces an up-tempo pong-pong-pong-pong. With proper body movements, Belly Bongo makes you your own bump-and-grind drummer. A checker in the electro-mechanical division at Honeywell, Fullerton spends his evenings designing and tapping away at product prototypes in his Largo home. Belly Bongo is the latest in a long line of toys and crafts he's invented. Fullerton explains his wealth of entertainment ideas as a direct result of the lack of hair on his head. "It's all because I'm bald-headed," he says with a laugh, "If you're bald-headed, it means you're crazy."

Tampa Bay Times - Apr 22, 1973


Springfield News-Leader - June 16, 1995



Tampa Bay Times - Apr 22, 1973

Posted By: Alex - Fri May 25, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions, Toys, 1970s

Raggedy Ann and Andy:  A Musical Adventure

Makes one savor the genius of TOY STORY and sequels even more.



Posted By: Paul - Wed May 09, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Movies, Music, Toys, 1970s

Feral Cheryl

An eco-feminist, anti-Barbie doll featuring tattoos, unshaven legs, pierced nipples, pubic hair, and dreadlocks. Created by Lee Duncan of Australia in 1995.

Duncan still has a few Feral Cheryls available for sale at her website feralcheryl.com.au. They're going for $75 AUD (about 57 US dollars).



Palm Beach Post - May 31, 1995

Posted By: Alex - Mon Apr 23, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Toys, Gender, 1990s

The Pretzel Jetzel





Posted By: Paul - Mon Mar 05, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, Toys, 1960s

Growing Up Skipper

In the Barbie family, Skipper is Barbie's younger sister. The 1975 version of her included the unusual feature that moving her arm caused her to experience "plastic puberty" (as one reporter put it). From wikipedia:

In 1975 Growing Up Skipper was released. The gimmick of the doll, which led to much controversy in the newspapers, was that if Skipper's arm was rotated, the doll would become an inch taller and small breasts would appear on her rubber torso. This concept was later used for Mattel's My Scene brand in 2007 with the "Growing Up Glam" line, which was also controversial.



Appleton Post-Crescent - Dec 19, 1975

Posted By: Alex - Thu Oct 19, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Toys

The Bubble Hat



More pix and info here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 09, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Eccentrics, Toys, Headgear, 1950s

Bugs for Dolls

From the Pittsburgh Press - Oct 23, 1938:

BUGS FOR DOLLS
Dead Crickets Are Toys in China

In China, where life is hard and patience strong, the toy man is a favorite of old and young. On the streets of Peiping he displays his wares and children flock to see — and if they have pennies — to buy. A set of his most fascinating wares are fashioned from skins of dead crickets, dressed up to satirize the many street vendors in the ancient city.


"This cricket has been mounted to represent a vendor of flowers and plants."



"These crickets represent a barber shaving a customer."



"Barbers bring their trade to the customer in China. They carry their 'shops' on long poles which they balance on one shoulder. Above is a Chinese cricket-barber carrying his tools along the street, offering to shave the head of any he meets."



"Bicycles fill the streets of Peiping. Hence the toy-man's set would be incomplete without a cricket astride a wheel."

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jul 10, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Toys, 1930s

Chilly Bang! Bang! Squirt Gun

The brief, controversial product life of the Chilly Bang! Bang! juice-filled squirt gun. Kids put the gun barrel in their mouth and squeezed the trigger to enjoy a refreshing squirt of juice.

First sales were halted because the plastic tab at the end of the barrel was deemed a choking hazard. Then in 1991 it was banned outright. New York Senator Nicholas Spano noted, "The last thing we should teach our children is to put gun barrels in their mouths."



Democrat and Chronicle - Aug 30, 1989



Democrat and Chronicle - Sep 6, 1989



The Ithaca Journal - May 18, 1991

Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 13, 2017 - Comments (8)
Category: Toys, 1990s

1960s Marx Presidents Set



Gee, I wonder why they quit adding new presidents after LBJ?


More info here.




Original ad here.

ADDENDUM: WU-vie GES seems to have found a Nixon figure from the final incarnations of this set.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Feb 05, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Politics, Toys, 1960s

Patty Prayer Doll





Posted By: Paul - Tue Dec 06, 2016 - Comments (8)
Category: Religion, Toys, 1970s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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