Category:
War

The War in Cuba Board Game





Official entry.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jun 22, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Games, War, Nineteenth Century

Your Biological Safety Mask

Posted By: Paul - Sun May 17, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Health, War, Children

Blaze, the Dog That Flew First Class



In the year 1945, a dog named Blaze, while being shipped on Army Transport planes, bumped off several traveling soldiers, causing a national controversy.

Read about it here.

A funnier account was composed by James Thurber, viewable after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Mon Mar 30, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Government, Scandals and Controversies, War, Air Travel and Airlines, Dogs, 1940s

Beware of Female Spies

During World War I, the U.S. Navy created a sign to warn its personnel of the threat posed by "inquisitive women".

By World War II, the sign was considered an odd curiosity, but it inspired a number of news photos of women reading the sign with interest.

source: Temple University Library



Shreveport Times - Mar 26, 1939



The Missoulian - Apr 2, 1939

Posted By: Alex - Mon Dec 02, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: War, Armed Forces, Spies and Intelligence Services

Prices Unlimited

Greedy, unpatriotic girls receive a visit from the Ghost of Meat Rationing Present.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 30, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, PSA’s, Public Humiliation, War, 1940s

One-Arm Sutton

We previously learned about Douglas Bader, the Legless Ace. Now we can contemplate the career of One-Arm Sutton.

Article here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 21, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: War, Twentieth Century, Dismemberment

Nicholas Zoueff, Boy War Hero





News article source.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Sep 19, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: War, Children, Asia, Russia, Twentieth Century

Douglas Bader, the Legless Ace



The Wikipedia page.

Bader joined the RAF in 1928, and was commissioned in 1930. In December 1931, while attempting some aerobatics, he crashed and lost both his legs. Having been on the brink of death, he recovered, retook flight training, passed his check flights and then requested reactivation as a pilot. Although there were no regulations applicable to his situation, he was retired against his will on medical grounds.[3]

After the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, however, Douglas Bader returned to the RAF and was accepted as a pilot. He scored his first victories over Dunkirk during the Battle of France in 1940. He then took part in the Battle of Britain and became a friend and supporter of Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory and his "Big Wing" experiments.

In August 1941, Bader baled out over German-occupied France and was captured. Soon afterward, he met and was befriended by Adolf Galland, a prominent German fighter ace.[4] Despite his disability, Bader made a number of escape attempts and was eventually sent to the prisoner of war camp at Colditz Castle. He remained there until April 1945 when the camp was liberated by the First United States Army.


He even featured in a comic. (Use link for readable copy of image below.)





Posted By: Paul - Mon Sep 16, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Accidents, War, Air Travel and Airlines, 1940s, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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