Category:
War

“Ubu” by Geoff Dunbar



Home page of creator.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Aug 19, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: War, Surrealism, Cartoons, 1970s

Birds of South Vietnam

It wasn't the subject of this book that made it weird, but instead when it was published: in 1968, at the height of the war in Vietnam. Not a time when a lot of people were going to Vietnam for bird-watching.

The British author, Philip Wildash, didn't even mention the war, except to obliquely refer to it in the first sentence by saying, "Vietnamese ornithology has long been rather neglected."

Amazon link: Birds of South Vietnam.


Minneapolis Star Tribune - Oct 6, 1968

Posted By: Alex - Tue May 22, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Animals, Hobbies and DIY, War, Books, 1960s

Atomic Bomber Arcade Game



Original ad here.

Learn the history here, including a beautiful color pic of the actual machine.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Apr 28, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Death, Destruction, Games, War, 1940s

Rambo Bubble Gum

Raspberry-flavored gum shaped to resemble shrapnel or flak.

Went on sale in 1985, as a tie-in with the release of Rambo II.

image source: Candy Wrapper Museum



Wisconsin State Journal - Nov 3, 1985



Posted By: Alex - Wed Apr 11, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: War, Candy, 1980s

Raus the Maus

Surely of interest to WU-vies.

Learn more here.



Posted By: Paul - Thu Mar 15, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Anthropomorphism, War, Cartoons, Europe, Twentieth Century

Chet Huntley Explains the Strategic Air Command



Be sure to enjoy the SAC theme song starting around 6:30.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 01, 2018 - Comments (7)
Category: Government, Music, War, Weapons, 1960s

Ronald’s no protester

But I wonder how Ronald ever got targeted by the selective service system if he hadn't registered yet.

Press and Sun Bulletin - Mar 13, 1968

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jan 15, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Military, War, 1960s

The CSS Shenandoah

The ship that continued to fight the Civil War after the surrender of the South.




From the Wikipedia entry:

On June 27, 1865, he learned from a prize, the Susan & Abigail, that General Robert E. Lee had surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia. Her captain produced a San Francisco newspaper reporting the flight from Richmond, Virginia, of the Confederate Government 10 weeks previously. However, the newspaper also contained Confederate President Jefferson Davis's proclamation that the "war would be carried on with re-newed vigor."[9] Waddell then captured 10 more whalers in the space of 7 hours just below the Arctic Circle.

On August 3, 1865, Waddell finally learned of the war's end when he met at sea the Liverpool barque Barracouta, which was bound for San Francisco.[10] He received the devastating news of the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army on April 26, Kirby Smith's army's surrender on May 26, and crucially the capture of President Davis and a part of his cabinet. Captain Waddell then knew the war was over.[9]

Captain Waddell lowered his Confederate flag, and the CSS Shenandoah underwent physical alteration. Her guns were dismounted and stored below deck, and her hull was painted to look like an ordinary merchant vessel.


Article here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 02, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Confusion, Misunderstanding, and Incomprehension, War, Nineteenth Century

Air Raid Noise Experiment

These pictures in the Google Arts picture archive don't come with any explanatory text, except that they're from an "Air Raid Noise Experiment" conducted in Nuneaton in 1941. But I suspect that the experiment was part of a series of psychological experiments conducted in the UK in 1941 that attempted to "harden Britons to bomb shock." The idea was to expose people to the sounds of air raid sirens and battle sounds so that they would lose their fear of them. As described in the news clipping below:

The suggestion was advanced that whole populations be put through the experiment to make them 'immune, through familiarity, to fear caused by air raid noises.'










The Greenfield Daily Reporter - Nov 28 1941



I've been aware of these experiments for a while. I previously posted something about them back in 2009. But I just came across these photos and realized they must be from one of these experiments.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Nov 02, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Noises and Other Public Disturbances of the Peace, War, Experiments, Psychology, 1940s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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