Category:
1960s

Presenting the Losers

A 1967 ad campaign for Eastern Airlines.

Of course, I'm pretty sure all the women in the ad were actually models/actresses. So in their true profession they were winners of a spot in the campaign. Most notably, that's Ali MacGraw sitting in the front row.

Time - Sep 29, 1967



Some analysis by Kathleen Barry in Femininity in Flight: A History of Flight Attendants

Since the 1930s stewardesses had been ubiquitous in airline advertising. But by the 1960s they carried even more figurative weight as the embodiments of airlines' mass-marketed personalities. Gone were generic references to friendly staff alongside offers of specific services and amenities; in came promises of a hand-picked servant for every passenger. An advertisement for Eastern from 1967, for instance, titled "Presenting the Losers," pictured a group of nineteen applicants whom the carrier had rejected for stewardess positions. The attractive, slender, and well-groomed "losers" were distinguishable from "winners" only by their frowns and lack of airline univorms. The text explained that they "were probably good enough to get a job practically anywhere they want," but that because of its high standards of appearance, intelligence, and personality, Eastern turned down nineteen desirable candidates for every exemplary one hired. With mock defensiveness, the ad read, "Sure, we want her to be pretty... don't you? That's why we look at her face, her make-up, her complexion, her figure, her weight, her legs, her grooming, her nails and her hair." In addition, Eastern boasted, it screened each applicant for "her personality, her maturity, her intelligence, her intentions, her enthusiasm, her resiliency and her stamina." With such an exhaustive list of qualifications, readers may have marveled (or doubted) that women so wondrous existed, let alone would serve them on Eastern.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jul 26, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Advertising, Air Travel and Airlines, 1960s

Wife Swapping By Mail

Posted By: Paul - Thu Jul 22, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Husbands, Wives, 1960s, Sex, Postal Services

A Dummy Goes to Africa

Unfortunately, the book is not digitized, and original copies go for big bucks. But you can see more pics and read an account of the tale at the link.



Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 21, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Puppets and Automatons, Religion, Books, 1960s, Africa

Ferdi Jansen

The artist's homepage. Sadly, she died very young in 1969.





Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 16, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, 1960s, Genitals

Weird alien sounds designed to terrify and panic

In 1969, Alfred Mardarello et al. were granted a patent for a "noisemaking device" which could be attached to a missile. When the missile was fired and flying through the air, their gadget would create "weird, alien sounds" intended to terrify the enemy. From their patent:

The invention relates to a projectile that is adapted to produce frightening noises while in flight, whereby such alien sounds will have a terrrifying effect on people nearby.

The psychological effects of weird or unexpected noises, which accompany an artillery projectile or missile, have been explored in many ways, prior to this invention, with minimum results. The Germans, in World War II, attached a noise producing device to aerial bombs, somewhat similar in construction to the organ pipe. A high pitched noise was created. This could be used only on large bombs and was too massive for use on artillery projectiles...

The insufficiencies of the prior art are overcome by the noisemaking adapter of the instant invention. The adapter ring is so designed that they attach to an existant missile without requiring modification of said missile. Centrifugal force, as a result of the spinning motion of the missile after being fired, causes the noisemaking arms or fins to extend and to produce weird, alien sounds of such magnitude as to be heard over a substantial area. The psychological effect, to create panic to those in the vicinity, is thus effected.

I have no idea if this patent was ever used in combat. But I don't really understand the point of making something that's already terrifying (a missile) even more terrifying by having it produce weird, alien sounds. Isn't the terror of the missile itself enough?

I guess it was part of the psychological warfare effort during Vietnam. See also Ghost Tape Number Ten.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jul 11, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: 1960s, Weapons, Cacophony, Dissonance, White Noise and Other Sonic Assaults

Doll-to-Doll Carpeting, and other Mr Leggs Ads

These Mr. Leggs ads offer a window onto the twisted male psyche of the 1960s. They ran in newspapers and magazines (Esquire) from 1963 to 1965.

"Though she was a tiger lady, our hero didn’t have to fire a shot to floor her. After one look at his Mr. Leggs slacks, she was ready to have him walk all over her. That noble styling sure soothes the savage heart! If you’d like your own doll-to-doll carpeting, hunt up a pair of these he-man Mr. Leggs slacks."



"It took him years of practice and dozens of bruised, outraged ladies, but he's perfected it. She's under his spell."



"Get all knotted up when she floats by? Relax."



"There they were at the snack bar... this one and her sister Eileen (roughly 38-20-38). He smiles; she smiles. He spoke; she responded eagerly. Asked him to watch the kid for a few minutes. That was two hours ago."



"Why torture yourself? Be flexible!"



"Our hero's had a hard day. He had to set up the hammock. And he had to crawl into it. Exhausting. Now he's ready to collect his reward."



"Even Cora the Cobra can't resist getting next to the man in a pair... proving that at times they're downright dangerous to wear. For other species of Cora's sex (like girls) are also apt to over-react to Slats' virile appeal."

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jul 10, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Advertising, Gender, Men, 1960s

Canned Heat and the Chipmunks:  Christmas Song

We are more or less halfway to Xmas, so why not celebrate early?



Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 10, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Music, Unlikely, Improbable and Counterfactual Phenomena, Bohemians, Beatniks, Hippies and Slackers, 1960s, Parody

Mystery Illustration 101

What are these folks doing?



The answer is here.

And after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 09, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Crowds, Groups, Mobs and Other Mass Movements, 1960s

Miss Air Force Recruiting Detachment 215

Celeste Yarnall may be best remembered for playing Yeoman Martha Landon in the 1967 Star Trek episode "The Apple".

She also starred in the 1971 cult hit The Velvet Vampire.

She was also quite successful outside of modeling and acting. According to wikipedia, she owned "one of L.A.'s top office real-estate firms".

Given all this, being awarded the oddly specific title of "Miss Air Force Recruiting Detachment 215 for 1964" has to rank as one of her lesser life achievements.

The Red Bank Daily Register - Mar 30, 1964



Celeste Yarnall as Yeoman Martha Landon

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jul 06, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, 1960s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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