Category:
Cannibalism

How to Cook Husbands

image

Alas, I wanted this 1898 book to be a tract by an angry feminist cannibal, but it is not--as you can see for yourself, if you go here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 22, 2015 - Comments (4)
Category: Cannibalism, Feminism, Food, Books, Nineteenth Century

He’ll Just Be Hungry Again In An Hour

An unfortunate Chinese woman who failed to answer her estranged husband's 2am phone call got a surprise visit at work the next day. The husband showed up and in a fit of temper bit her nose off and swallowed it. Due to the tissue being unrecoverable it will be at least 3 months before any reconstructive surgery can be done for her.

Posted By: patty - Thu Sep 10, 2015 - Comments (1)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Cannibalism, Husbands, Can’t Possibly Be True, Face and Facial Expressions, Eating

Placenta Smoothies



Unsafe for Revulsion-prone Stomachs.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Mar 22, 2015 - Comments (4)
Category: Body, Blood, Cannibalism, Eccentrics, Fads, Food

Pro Basketball Player Eaten by Cannibals?

image

Vanished forever in Africa while visiting Idi Amin. Surname suspiciously close to "brisket." 'Nuff said.

Contemporary account from 1985.

Article from 2007.

Wikipedia.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 16, 2014 - Comments (8)
Category: Cannibalism, Sports, 1980s, Africa

Sunglasses for Chickens

Invented in 1937 to control cannibalism among chickens. Apparently chickens have a natural instinct to peck each other, but the sight of blood intensifies this instinct. So much so that if one chicken has blood on its feathers, all the others in the flock will peck it to death. This was a real problem for farmers until these rose-colored chicken sunglasses came along, which made it hard for the chickens to see the sight of blood. Nowadays, farmers must have other solutions to the problem of chicken cannibalism, because these glasses are no longer manufactured and are considered collector's items. (National Band and Tag via Feathered Forager)

chicken glasses

Posted By: Alex - Mon Apr 02, 2012 - Comments (6)
Category: Animals, Farming, Cannibalism, Fashion

Fijian Cannibal Forks

If you're ever at a dinner party where the host has a set of forks that look like these, you might want to consider leaving, quickly.

These are Fijian "cannibal forks" used for eating human flesh. The iron dance blog offers this description of them:

The cannibal fork, or iculanibokola, was used by attendants during ritual feasts to feed individuals considered too holy to touch food. These forks arose for several reasons. First is a cultural taboo that prohibits chiefs and priests from touching food with their hands. Common Fijians generally did not use utensils until Europeanization. One of the most important ceremonies a chieftain participated in was the devouring of their or the tribes enemy. Combining the significance of the event and the inability to use their hands the chiefs needed a way to participate-hence the development of the cannibal fork. Forks became a way to show power and influence. The fancier more elaborate the fork, the higher status the owner had.

Fijian cannibal forks are still made, to sell to tourists. What the tourists use them for... I guess that's their own business.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Feb 15, 2012 - Comments (6)
Category: Cannibalism, Food, Rituals and Superstitions

Hamatsa



Did the Kwakiutl Indians practice cannibalism? Learn more here.



Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 08, 2011 - Comments (3)
Category: Cannibalism, Documentaries, North America, Nineteenth Century

Toto Coelo

total coelo - i eat cannibals from alexei glowakz on Vimeo.



If you didn't live through the 1980s, you would not believe they happened.

Toto Coelo info here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 01, 2011 - Comments (2)
Category: Cannibalism, Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Music, 1980s

The Past Is Another Country #1

From The Saturday Evening Post for April 13 1963.

I'm guessing by the signature that this is the work of Ronald Michaud.

image

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jun 09, 2009 - Comments (1)
Category: Cannibalism, Food, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1960s, Africa

Life Imitates Art

Here are two commercials to watch. I believe that you will see a startling similarity emerge that will shake you to the core (or maybe just halfway to the core).



So far, so good. It's your basic ad for cosmetics, showing a heavily airbrushed woman who looks somewhat like an android (gynoid?), poncing around in an empty, black, out-of-focus room, interspersed with product shots against a stark white background. (I'm always a little saddened when the real product doesn't create lines of light in contour around my wife's face.) I don't know to much about the product's specific properties.

What I know for sure is that it bares a startling similarity to a fictional product I have seen before.


More in extended >>

Posted By: kingmonkey - Tue May 05, 2009 - Comments (5)
Category: Armageddon and Apocalypses, Body Modifications, Cannibalism, Cosmetics, Movies, Advertising

Page 2 of 3 pages  < 1 2 3 > 




weird universe thumbnail
Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Contact Us
Monthly Archives
September 2021 •  August 2021 •  July 2021 •  June 2021 •  May 2021 •  April 2021 •  March 2021 •  February 2021 •  January 2021

December 2020 •  November 2020 •  October 2020 •  September 2020 •  August 2020 •  July 2020 •  June 2020 •  May 2020 •  April 2020 •  March 2020 •  February 2020 •  January 2020

December 2019 •  November 2019 •  October 2019 •  September 2019 •  August 2019 •  July 2019 •  June 2019 •  May 2019 •  April 2019 •  March 2019 •  February 2019 •  January 2019

December 2018 •  November 2018 •  October 2018 •  September 2018 •  August 2018 •  July 2018 •  June 2018 •  May 2018 •  April 2018 •  March 2018 •  February 2018 •  January 2018

December 2017 •  November 2017 •  October 2017 •  September 2017 •  August 2017 •  July 2017 •  June 2017 •  May 2017 •  April 2017 •  March 2017 •  February 2017 •  January 2017

December 2016 •  November 2016 •  October 2016 •  September 2016 •  August 2016 •  July 2016 •  June 2016 •  May 2016 •  April 2016 •  March 2016 •  February 2016 •  January 2016

December 2015 •  November 2015 •  October 2015 •  September 2015 •  August 2015 •  July 2015 •  June 2015 •  May 2015 •  April 2015 •  March 2015 •  February 2015 •  January 2015

December 2014 •  November 2014 •  October 2014 •  September 2014 •  August 2014 •  July 2014 •  June 2014 •  May 2014 •  April 2014 •  March 2014 •  February 2014 •  January 2014

December 2013 •  November 2013 •  October 2013 •  September 2013 •  August 2013 •  July 2013 •  June 2013 •  May 2013 •  April 2013 •  March 2013 •  February 2013 •  January 2013

December 2012 •  November 2012 •  October 2012 •  September 2012 •  August 2012 •  July 2012 •  June 2012 •  May 2012 •  April 2012 •  March 2012 •  February 2012 •  January 2012

December 2011 •  November 2011 •  October 2011 •  September 2011 •  August 2011 •  July 2011 •  June 2011 •  May 2011 •  April 2011 •  March 2011 •  February 2011 •  January 2011

December 2010 •  November 2010 •  October 2010 •  September 2010 •  August 2010 •  July 2010 •  June 2010 •  May 2010 •  April 2010 •  March 2010 •  February 2010 •  January 2010

December 2009 •  November 2009 •  October 2009 •  September 2009 •  August 2009 •  July 2009 •  June 2009 •  May 2009 •  April 2009 •  March 2009 •  February 2009 •  January 2009

December 2008 •  November 2008 •  October 2008 •  September 2008 •  August 2008 •  July 2008 •