Weird Universe Blog — December 2, 2017

Singed Fashion

"Inspired by a conflagration in his own showroom, designer Marcos Egas offers shirts with singed collars, pockets and cuffs."

If life deals you lemons, sell lemonade. Or, if your showroom burns down, sell burnt clothes.

Pensacola News-Journal - June 5, 1994

Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 02, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Fashion, 1990s

Follies of the Madmen #338



Original ad here.

I find this ad too creepy for me even to register the product, as if it were something out of THE TWILIGHT ZONE.

But perhaps that's because I was seriously creeped out by this comic book cover when I was a kid!



Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 02, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Body Modifications, Business, Advertising, Products, Puppets and Automatons, Comics, 1950s, 1960s

December 1, 2017

Christophpher

June 1996: A Danish mother, Pia Agergaard, won a 9-year court battle to be allowed to name her son Christophpher. The Danish courts had tried to prevent her using the unorthodox spelling, fearing it would have a detrimental effect on her son. They insisted she use Christopher or Christoffer instead.

Bismarck Tribune - June 13, 1996



In 2008, a Danish newspaper (avisen.dk) checked back in with Christophpher, who by then was 21. He reported that he had never experienced any disadvantage on account of his name:

When Christophpher was born in 1987, his parents wanted to give him the distinctive name to signal how special he was as their firstborn.
But for nine years it did not go. The Church Ministry refused to approve the special spelling. The name could be detrimental to the child, it said.
That argument shakes Christophpher at the head of today. Because he has never actually experienced his name as a disadvantage. He has never been teased because of it. And he has not had other problems with the name, for example, when he should have a passport, he says.


Christophpher

Posted By: Alex - Fri Dec 01, 2017 - Comments (9)
Category: Odd Names, 1990s

Mystery Illustration 63



I have erased the thing being sold in this ad. But what possible solution is being touted for this man's incredible distress and misfortune?


Answer is here.

Or after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Dec 01, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Advertising, 1960s

November 30, 2017

Service for smiles

Given an equal choice, will a store clerk first serve a smiling or a frowning customer?

Science provides the answer. Clerks go toward the smiler.

Maybe this is why it's so hard to ever get help in Home Depot. I need to be grinning more.

Elmira Star Gazette - Dec 11, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Thu Nov 30, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Science, Psychology, Shopping

A Rose and a Baby Ruth



Apology on the cheap.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 30, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Music, Nature, Teenagers, Candy, 1950s, Love & Romance

November 29, 2017

Indecent Apes

McAllen Monitor - Nov 19, 1993



The offending cover. It's true, you can see a dangly bit there, as well as some naked ta-tas.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Nov 29, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Censorship, Bluenoses, Taboos, Prohibitions and Other Cultural No-No's, 1990s

A Is for Atom PSA



Dr. Atom is a hideous abomination of nightmare fuel.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 29, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: PSA's, Science, 1950s

November 28, 2017

Circulatory effects of trumpet playing

"Circulatory Effects of Trumpet Playing" (British Medical Journal - 1959) details a self-experiment by a professional trumpet player to determine the best position in which to play the trumpet to avoid blacking out while playing high loud notes. He determines that laying down flat offers the most blackout protection.

Another curious detail from the article: his suggestion that trumpeters in orchestras could avoid blackout by wearing pressure suits "which could be surreptitiously inflated by a switch on the conductor's desk."



It is well known among professional trumpeters that playing high loud notes for more than a few seconds may cause dizziness or occasionally 'black-out.' Indeed, many leading orchestras carry an assistant or 'mate' to take over from the first trumpet in prolonged difficult passages...

Apart from the discomfort of occasional dizzy sensations or black-outs, trumpet players are not likely to come to any harm. Vasodilation from heat or previous hyperventilation will exaggerate the effects of a given intrathoracic pressure. It is better to sit than stand, but the strict supine posture, which would be better still, seems hardly feasible. For orchestras in severe financial difficulties it might be possible to dispense with the assistant or 'mate' if the trumpeter wore a pilot's pressure-suit, which could be surreptitiously inflated by a switch on the conductor's desk.

Posted By: Alex - Tue Nov 28, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Music, Science

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All original content in posts is Copyright © 2016 by the author of the post, which is usually either Alex Boese ("Alex"), Paul Di Filippo ("Paul"), or Chuck Shepherd ("Chuck"). All rights reserved. The banner illustration at the top of this page is Copyright © 2008 by Rick Altergott.

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