Category:
1930s

Marion Zioncheck, Bipolar Congressman



Congressman Marion Zioncheck , America ' s crazy MP , is in gaol at Washington after having been accused of standing on his landlady and hurling bottles and a typewriter through the windows of his wrecked Washington apartment uttering wild cries all the time . The incident occurred at the end of a whirlwind honeymoon tour . Mr . Zioncheck has just returned to America with his bride from the turbulent South American island of Porto Rico , which they were requested to leave after figuring in a series of " incidents." On one occasion the Congressman pelted passers-by with coconuts from his balcony . Then the couple arrived back in Washington they were soon involved in the dispute with the landlady , Mrs . Benjamin Young , who told the ambulance men that "Zioncheck ruined my home , called me vile names and stood on me " . It is now stated that Zioncheck intends to run for the US Vice - presidency .


Read the whole sad story--ending in suicide--here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Oct 08, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Bad Habits, Neuroses and Psychoses, Death, Government, Officials, 1930s, Mental Health and Insanity

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 23



Posted By: Paul - Fri Oct 04, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Surrealism, 1930s, Russia

Mystery Illustration 86



What is the nature of the fabric of this gown?

The answer is here.

And beyond the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Sep 27, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Fashion, 1930s

Velvet-Lined Bathtub

Back in 1936, interior decorators predicted a popular future for velvet-lined bathtubs.

I can only imagine they would have been a nightmare to clean.

Pottsville Republican and Herald - Dec 4, 1936



Emery County Progress - Nov 27, 1936



Update: Thanks to our knowledgeable readers, Floormaster Squeeze and KDP, for pointing out that Steve Martin had a line in one of his routines about buying a fur-lined sink. I found the clip on YouTube (audio only, unfortunately). The fur-lined sink reference occurs less than a minute in.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Sep 13, 2019 - Comments (7)
Category: Bathrooms, Baths, Showers and Other Cleansing Methods, 1930s

The Man Who Wanted to Sell Himself to Science

Like a lot of people during the great depression, William Bird of Jacksonville, Vermont had fallen on hard times. He was out of work, heavily in debt, and facing eviction. He feared he would soon be unable to feed his wife and three children. So Bird came up with a plan. He would sell himself to science.

Los Angeles Times - Nov 15, 1936



He announced his offer in November 1936 by sending a letter to the local press. It read, in part:

I’m sick and tired of being in debt and without a job. Everything seems to have failed. There’s no work to speak of. I’m in debt $400. Food is running low. The fire in our kitchen stove is going out. My wife and three children need clothes to keep them warm during the winter. I’ve got to keep them together. There seems to be only one hope. I’d like to sell myself for $2500…

If there is some doctor or group of doctors or scientists who’ll advance me $2500, I’ll agree to pay it back in two years. I have to sort of sell or mortgage myself because that’s the only security I can put up.

Now, if I failed to pay back the money when the time was up, I’d let them do anything they want with me. I’d let them try and kind of experiment on me.

Soon he sweetened the offer by specifying that it would be all right with him if he didn't survive the experimentation process. Naturally, his wife was opposed to the whole idea.

The media spread his unusual offer nationwide. Reporters noted that he was a prime physical specimen — six feet tall, 175 pounds, and a sturdy workman of good habits. In other words, excellent guinea pig material.

An anonymous Texan took sympathy on Bird and sent him $10. However, the scientific community wasn't tempted. No doctors took him up on his offer.

Although Bird didn't manage to sell himself as a human guinea pig, his story nevertheless had a happy ending. Within days of making his appeal, Bird was given a job on a construction project. He said, "I don't know who was responsible for giving me work, but I sure appreciate it." But he also noted that, despite now having a job, his offer still stood. He was still willing to sell himself to science, should some doctor ever want to take him up on it.

Los Angeles Times - Nov 18, 1936

Posted By: Alex - Mon Sep 09, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Science, Experiments, 1930s

Healthiest US Pair



This is quite a distinction conferred by the 4-H congress of Chicago. I assume they examined every person in the USA before deciding.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 07, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Health, 1930s

Mystery Gadget 80

What's happening here?



Answer at the link.

Or after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Aug 23, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Technology, 1930s

Wilson, Keppel and Betty

Two versions of another weird dance, inspired by Alex's recent posting! That is, Alex inspired my post, not the locomotions of the dancers!

Their Wikipedia page.





Posted By: Paul - Fri Aug 09, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: 1930s, Dance

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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