Category:
1970s

The Hazardous Maxi-coat

It's getting colder outside, here in the Northern Hemisphere--but be careful of how you bundle up!






Source.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 05, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Death, Fashion, 1970s, Pain, Self-inflicted and Otherwise

Weirdo the Cat-Killing Superchicken

Weirdo was a giant among chickens. He weighed a colossal twenty-three pounds — about four times the size of an average rooster. Throughout much of the 1970s and 80s, he was listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the heaviest chicken in the world. He was said to have the strength and stamina of an ostrich.

"Grant Sullens holds his prize 23-lb. White Sully rooster. Note the gloves he is wearing for protection. Note also that the photographer stayed on the safe side of the fence." Source: Farm Journal - Nov 1971.

However, Weirdo had a temper and ferocity that matched his size. His violent exploits were legendary. He killed two cats and pecked out the eye of a dog. He routinely tore bits of metal off his feed bucket, demolishing feeders at a rate of one per month. When an ungloved visitor made the mistake of trying to touch him, he removed their fingertip. He shattered the lens of a camera. And, in his crowning achievement, he managed to rip through a wire fence and attacked and killed one of his own sons, an eighteen-pound rooster.

Just as unusual as Weirdo himself was the story of how he came to exist. He was the result of a seven-year chicken-breeding program conducted by a teenage boy, Grant Sullens, of West Point, California. Sullens had decided that he wanted to create a breed of "superchickens," and he actually achieved his goal, succeeding where highly paid poultry researchers had failed.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 18, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Animals, Farming, 1970s

Dirty diapers as art

Artist Mary Kelly’s 1976 exhibit at the Insitute of Contemporary Art in London consisted of a framed series of soiled liners from her kid’s diapers. Below the fecal stains, she listed what her kid had eaten in order to produce the marks.

The exhibit provoked outrage. Siona Wilson, in her book Art Labor, Sex Politics: Feminist Effects in 1970s British Art and Performance, notes, "Kelly was forced to go into hiding for a time to avoid the unwanted media attention."

More info: vice.com, MaryKellyArtist.com



The Twin Falls Times-News - Oct 17, 1976

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 11, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Babies, 1970s

Take-My-Lips Kit

Back in 1972, South Mountain Passage offered people the chance to have their lips cast in bronze for only $21.75. That seems like a pretty good deal, considering that the next year Yves Saint Laurent was going to charge $400 for the same thing.



Pittsburgh Press - Mar 16, 1973

Posted By: Alex - Sat Nov 09, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Body, 1970s

Michael in Wonderland

Michael Jackson takes a Magical Mystery Tour.



Posted By: Paul - Mon Nov 04, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Music, Surrealism, Cartoons, Psychedelic, 1970s

Bodysuits for men

A fashion fad of the 1970s.



San Bernardino County Sun - Oct 7, 1973



Bridgeport Telegram - Oct 27, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Wed Oct 23, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Fashion, 1970s

Yellow Pages Dress

The Yellow Pages? What are those?



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Oct 22, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Fashion, Telephones, 1970s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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