Category:
1970s

Pop-Topping

Back in the old days, cans were opened by pulling on an aluminum ring, or "pop top," that would come completely off the can. Now these have been replaced by stay-tabs.

Most people threw away the pop-tops, but a few turned them into wearable art. The leader of this movement was Gonzalo Chavez, aka Pop-Top Terp. From Time magazine (Sep 21, 1970):

In his San Juan workshop, Designer Gonzalo Chavez, 36, a native New Yorker who calls himself Mr. Terp, has been painstakingly assembling pop-top rings into glittering dresses, vests, stoles, belts, miniskirts and maxiskirts—all resembling the mailed armor worn by warriors of the Middle Ages to ward off sword blows. Collecting the rings from rubbish heaps behind San Juan bars, Chavez files down their rough edges and crochets them together with silver thread...

The first pop-top garments were almost as stiff as their medieval counterparts. But Chavez has made them much more supple. "They fit like a second skin," he claims. "As you wear them, they change shape a little and mold themselves to the contours of the body." Rings differ too. Budweiser's rings are light and flexible, Miller High Life's are "soft," and Pepsi's provide a heavier, stiffer garment.

In 1975, Pop-Top Terp published a book, Pop-Topping, that gave detailed instructions on how to make your own pop-top clothes. But since pop tops have now vanished, it's become a guide to a lost form of art. You can read it online at archive.org.









Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 18, 2024 - Comments (2)
Category: Fashion, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1970s

Woman dropped down manhole

Welcome to America!

Modesto Bee - July 2, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jun 17, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Crime, 1970s

The 1975 McDonald’s Puke-In

Oct 17, 1975: A group of protestors calling themselves the Radical Vegetarian League staged a "puke-in" at a McDonald's on the Ann Arbor campus of the University of Michigan. The protestors drank down a mixture of mustard and water, and then they vomited from the second-floor balcony of the restaurant onto the floor below. They said they were "protesting the poor quality of food served in places like this and the fact that fast food chains go into local communities and drive out small, independent restaurants."

Thanks to this story I learned that mustard water has been used as an emetic since ancient times.



Michigan Daily - Oct 18, 1975



Benton Harbor Herald-Palladium - Oct 18, 1975



The McDonald's at which the puke-in occurred. The building was torn down in 1995.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jun 13, 2024 - Comments (2)
Category: Restaurants, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, 1970s

Adam 2

Reminds me of the cartoons of Terry Gilliam.

The creator's Wikipedia page.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jun 08, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Surrealism, Cartoons, 1970s

Thrillington

There have been numerous occasions of artists hiding their involvement with their own work. Not just using a pseudonym, but actively encouraging a hoax. Here's one such. From the album's Wikipedia page:

Thrillington is an album produced by English musician Paul McCartney, under the pseudonym Percy "Thrills" Thrillington.... [In] late 1976, McCartney decided to release the long-in-storage project, and devised a plan to publicize the album while obscuring his own involvement with it. In preparation for the release of Thrillington, McCartney invented the fictitious socialite Percy Thrillington, and even took out ads in various UK music papers announcing Thrillington's so-called comings and goings to generate curiosity and interest.

Released in April 1977, McCartney's name was mentioned only in the main liner notes where he is described as a friend of Percy. Thrillington went mostly unnoticed upon its release although it was reviewed by Rolling Stone magazine and mentioned in the "Random Notes" section.[5] Variety also reviewed the album, noting that "Whether Percy Thrillington is Paul McCartney or not is really irrelevant. What matters is that he (they) is (are) having fun."[6]


Listen to the other tracks at the link.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jun 05, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Hoaxes and Imposters and Imitators, Music, 1970s, United Kingdom

Money Card

No need for a subliminal hook for future customers in this one--it's all explicit! Buy American Express Traveler's Cheques.

The entry at Board Game Geek.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jun 04, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Games, Money, 1970s, Europe

Follies of the Madmen #597

An epic crossover! Rosie (of Bounty fame) meets Mr. Whipple (of Charmin notoriety).

Posted By: Paul - Fri May 31, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Domestic, Hygiene, Advertising, Retailing, Wimps, Milquetoasts and Cowards, 1970s

Sweet Cookie Doll





Posted By: Paul - Mon May 27, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Toys, Advertising, AI, Robots and Other Automatons, 1970s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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