Category:
1970s

The man whom bullets bounced off of

In 1976, King Dixon of Miami was shot five times at close range in the head during a bar fight. Not a single bullet penetrated his skull. He was hospitalized overnight for observation, and then released the following day in satisfactory condition.

Alexandria Town Talk - May 10, 1976



Casper Star-Tribune - May 12, 1976



It seemed at the time like he must have been bulletproof, but a follow-up by Miami Herald crime reporter Edna Buchanan, in her book Never Let Them See You Cry, reveals that he was affected by bullets after all:

Dixon was treated at a hospital and sent home, where I talked to him the next day. "My ears are still ringing," he said. "The gun was right at my ear. Those shots were really loud." Other than that, he felt fine. "I guess you have to ask the good Lord why I'm still alive."
But the bullets did kill him. I found King Dixon at the morgue eight years later. Since the shooting he had suffered seizures, and one of them killed him.
The medical examiner blamed the old bullet wounds and ruled the death a homicide.
King Dixon became Miami's only murder victim in 1984 killed by bullets fired in 1976.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jun 12, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Crime, Human Marvels, 1970s, Weapons

The CB Bears

What fad of our current era will date as badly as CB radio?

The Wikipedia page.



Posted By: Paul - Thu Jun 11, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Animals, Fads, Humor, Parody, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Cartoons, 1970s

Slammed door, house fell down

The strange case of Mary Adams of Stockport, England, who slammed shut her front door, causing the house to collapse into rubble.

Fort Lauderdale News - Jan 22, 1975



I was curious what the scene of the house collapse looked like today. After some searching on Google maps, I'm pretty sure her house was situated by the Park Bridge in Stockport (which is part of Greater Manchester). Though I'm not sure what side of the bridge it was on.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jun 06, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Architecture, 1970s

Freeze-Dried Human Bodies

Philip Backman's 1978 patent describes a process for freeze-drying human bodies.

The problem with freeze-drying any large animal is that there's not enough surface area to allow for rapid freeze-drying. So, to increase the surface area, Backman explained that it would first be necessary to freeze the body and then smash it into small pieces in a hammer mill. Once the body had undergone this "surface enhancement," it could be rapidly freeze-dried, which would remove the water in the body, reducing its weight by 95%. The resulting remains could be kept in an urn, just like cremated remains.

Backman argued that his freeze-drying process had all the advantages of cremation (in terms of reducing the body to a compact size), but cost less. However, the funeral industry apparently didn't like the idea of running bodies through a hammer mill.



Posted By: Alex - Sun May 31, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Death, Inventions, 1970s

1979 TV Commercials

Your time machine back to forty years ago. Perhaps a solace in such troubled times as now.

Posted By: Paul - Sat May 30, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Culture and Civilization, Foreign Customs, 1970s

Guard Pig

We recently posted about tarantulas used to guard jewelry. Another unconventional security animal was CP, the guard pig, trained to attack by animal trainer Marcel Leblanc:

The thin, tanned Leblanc said he has trained attack dogs for Canadian police departments for 17 years.
Leblanc said he bought CP—which stands for Canadian Pig—"to fatten up and slaughter for a friend's party."
But he said he noticed the 150-pound, 6-month-old, pink and white Yorkshire pig learned tricks quickly. So he placed the animal among the Doberman pinschers and German shepherds in a police canine training program.
"The pig performed better than the dogs," said Leblanc.

If a 150-pound pig was charging at me, I'd sure run away!

Orlando Sentinel - Sep 23, 1979



El Paso Times - Oct 10, 1979





Fort Worth Star Telegram - Oct 10, 1979

Posted By: Alex - Thu May 28, 2020 - Comments (7)
Category: Animals, Crime, 1970s

The Phone Thing

Those of us who are old enough might recall that in addition to linear slide rules, there were circular slide rules.

Such an arrangement of movable circular parts was extrapolated to a variety of other gadgets for calculating different things.

You can see a museum of such "disk or wheel" charts here.



I set out on this search thanks to the 1979 ad below.

I wonder if anyone relies on such devices nowadays, or if businesses create them for promotional purposes, as Bell Telephones did in 1979.



Phone Thing source. (Page 6)

Posted By: Paul - Thu May 28, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Telephones, Instruments and Measuring Devices, 1970s

The gunman who wasn’t there

"Oakland police spent two hours last night trying to convince a mentally disturbed gunman holed up in his apartment to surrender—only to discover that he was standing next to them helping to direct the police."

San Francisco Examiner - June 16, 1974

Posted By: Alex - Wed May 27, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Crime, 1970s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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