Category:
Advertising

Two Milk Trucks



Posted By: Paul - Wed Sep 15, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Motor Vehicles, Advertising, Twentieth Century

The Perma-Lift Line of Undergarments

I'm surprised no one has revived this trade name.









Posted By: Paul - Tue Sep 14, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Advertising, Underwear, Twentieth Century

Follies of the Madmen #515

Either an eensy-teensy chopping block and cleaver, or a very large can of tuna.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Sep 12, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Enlargements, Miniatures, and Other Matters of Scale, Food, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1960s

Sour Cream Cookbook Ad

We're sweet on sour cream.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Sep 10, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Advertising, 1950s

Advertising Club Beauty Contest



Miss Margaret Gorman presenting the wooden loving-cup to "Miss" Alexandria, winner of the Advertising Club's "beauty" contest, held at the Raleigh yesterday. In business life pretty "Miss" Alexandria is Sylvan Oppenheimer. "Miss Congress Heights," the young "lady" with the rolling pin, is Allan De Ford. The debonair "Miss" Georgetown is Sidney Selinger and the charming young lady with the raven locks, "Miss Four-and-a-Half Street," is none other than Paul Heller] [1921 September 21]


Source.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Sep 09, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Humor, Parody, Advertising, 1920s

Captain Yancey and His Fabulous Autogyro



Source of clipping: Quad-City Times (Davenport, Iowa) 03 Jul 1931, Fri Page 1



Good article here.

The Pitcairn PCA-2 autogyro was developed in 1931 and proved to be a reliable, unique aircraft. The rotor at its top was unpowered and it flew more like a fixed wing aircraft than a helicopter, based on the power from its radial engine on the nose. Once at speed, the rotor spun based on aerodynamic forces alone thus generating lift. It was an amazing sight and attracted crowds wherever it flew. By April of 1931, the autogyro had flown across the United States at the hands of John M. Miller, had landed on the White House lawn (by test pilot Jim Ray), and had soared to a new altitude record of 18,415 feet (this being Amelia Earhart’s record).

Seizing upon the press interest in the design, the Champion Spark Plug company purchased one and painted the sides with their logo and named it “Miss Champion”. It was the perfect flying billboard. After hiring Captain Lewis “Lew” Yancey, a former Naval Lieutenant and USCG officer who was a maritime captain, they directed that he fly the nation on an advertising tour. By the end of 1931, Captain Yancey had flown the autogyro 6,500 miles, transiting 21 states and touching down in 38 cities around the nation. Yet the Champion Spark Plugs company still wanted more attention — and thus they asked him to beat Amelia Earhart’s altitude record as well.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Sep 05, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Inventions, Publicity Stunts, World Records, Advertising, Air Travel and Airlines, 1930s

What happens when a fly lands on your food

1970 ad for the UK Health Education Council. The text is credited to Charles Saatchi, who was then a young advertising executive (and is now a wealthy art collector).

More info: The Guardian

Posted By: Alex - Tue Aug 31, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Insects, Advertising, 1970s

Follies of the Madmen #514

A face to inspire confidence?

The source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 30, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Intelligence, Motor Vehicles, 1900s

The Ballad of a Gentle Laxative

These 1987 TV ads for Doxidan laxative, featuring the 'Doxidan Cowboy,' seem to inspire both love and hate. A lot of people on YouTube remember them fondly, but in newspapers from the time they were often cited as being among the most annoying commercials on TV.

The singer was Skeeter Starke. He has a YouTube channel.





Fort Myers News-Press - Jan 25, 1987



via History's Dumpster

Posted By: Alex - Thu Aug 26, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Music, Advertising, Excrement, 1980s

Melvin Belli Drinks Glenfiddich

The ad below, in which trial lawyer Melvin Belli endorsed Glenfiddich scotch, ran in the New York Times and New York Magazine in early 1970. Taken at face value, it doesn't seem like a particularly noteworthy ad. However, it occupies a curious place in legal history.

Before the 1970s, it was illegal for lawyers to advertise their services. So when Belli appeared in this ad, the California State Bar decided he had run afoul of this law — even though he hadn't directly advertised his services. It suspended his license for a year. The California Supreme Court later lowered this to a 30-day suspension — but it didn't dismiss the punishment entirely.

Some high-placed judges felt sympathetic to Belli, which added fuel to the movement to end the 'no advertising' law for lawyers, and by 1977, the Supreme Court had struck down the ban on advertising, saying that it violated the First Amendment. That's why ads for legal services now appear all over the place. Compared to the ads one sees nowadays, Belli's scotch endorsement really seems like no big deal at all.

More info: Belli v. State Bar, "Remember when lawyers couldn't advertise?"

New York Magazine - Mar 2, 1970

Posted By: Alex - Mon Aug 16, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Law, Advertising, 1970s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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