Category:
Advertising

“Perfect smoke column from end to end”

The model looks slightly out-of-it as the "Accu-Ray" machine deposits an endless supply of cigarettes into her hand. Perhaps, like James Bond, she had a 70-cigarette-a-day habit that had to be constantly fed.

Life - June 13, 1955

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 23, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Advertising, Smoking and Tobacco, 1950s

Admiral Cigarettes Film

The cigarette genie appears!

Posted By: Paul - Mon Nov 23, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Magic and Illusions and Sleight of Hand, Advertising, Smoking and Tobacco, Nineteenth Century

Plan a super spread for Thanksgiving

A recent ad from Giant Foods, given a double meaning by Covid. More info: nbc.com

Posted By: Alex - Sat Nov 21, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Advertising, Thanksgiving, Diseases

Germs pick out the weak ones

The theme of this 1920's ad campaign was that if your kid didn't eat Ralston Purina breakfast cereal, then he/she was going to die.

A child's life is a fight! Danger Days are always ahead. Danger Days — the days when little lives hang in the balance — may come next year, next month, or perhaps — tomorrow. Your children must meet these Danger Days. Are they ready? Will they win?

Fitchburg Sentinel - Jan 3, 1928



Pittsburgh Press - Nov 1, 1927

Posted By: Alex - Thu Nov 19, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Health, Advertising, Cereal, 1920s

Follies of the Madmen #493

Yak, yak, yak on the phone all day about makeup! Those gals!

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 18, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Cosmetics, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1960s, Women

The Spare Tire Cover as Advertising Medium

The earliest surviving instances of this mode of advertising seem to be really rare. If any WU-vie can find more examples, that would be great!

Of course, nowadays you can have custom-designed spare tire covers at the drop of a hat!



Source.



Second Honeymoon (20th Century Fox, 1937). Spare Tire Cover. Throughout the thirties the studios would offer in their pressbooks what were spare tire covers that would advertise their upcoming feature. This silkscreen cover for the Tyrone Power and Loretta Young romance has elastic bands in back which allow it slip right over the tire that was always visible on the back of the automobiles of that time. Probably the theater owner, ushers, or cab companies would be paid to use these. Very interesting novelty that are often seen in pressbooks but few have survived.


Source.



Source.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 05, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Advertising, 1930s, Cars

Follies of the Madmen #492

Is Miss Fixit a nurse or a child--or both? I'm confused....



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Nov 01, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Hygiene, 1950s, Love & Romance

Scary Morning Mouth

Happy Halloween!

Life - Oct 26, 1953

Posted By: Alex - Sat Oct 31, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Advertising, 1950s, Halloween

Twenty Minutes of 1960s Hygiene Commercials



If all these products had been properly employed, Americans would have had perfect lives!

Posted By: Paul - Fri Oct 23, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Hygiene, 1960s, Hair and Hairstyling

She dreamed she was an eskimo

What exactly is going on here? Is the polar bear playing peekaboo with the woman who's dressed inappropriately for Arctic weather? Or is it about to rip her face off?

Life - Jan 11, 1954

Posted By: Alex - Thu Oct 22, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Advertising, 1950s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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