Category:
Advertising

Follies of the Madmen #330



This wife has a problem bigger than an inconsiderate husband--he's a clinical alcoholic!

From THE ELKS MAGAZINE for November 1950.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Oct 17, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Addictions, Alcohol, Business, Advertising, Products, Domestic, Appliances, 1950s

Follies of the Madmen #329



Tony the Tiger is a protective deity against the occult forces of Friday the Thirteenth?

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Oct 13, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Food, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #328



As you can see, this ad appeared in the April issue of EBONY magazine, thus rendering any possible connection to Halloween, the time of ghosts, utterly irrelevant. What is the excuse for the pun, then? Because Herb-Ox represents the ghost of a cow? It's utterly arbitrary and unseductive and not germane to the product. Yet some ad guy obviously thought it was genius.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Oct 11, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Superstition, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #327



Dogs appreciate fresh breath.



Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 02, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Hygiene, Dogs, 1930s

Eight Minutes of 1979 Commercials



Talking dogs, dancing housewives, magical cleansers--plainly, we were all insane.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 30, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Advertising, Products, 1970s

Easy Does It:  Canned Goods Rule



The bad-acid-trip Good Fairy of Canned Vegetables talks about marketplace disruptions and paradigm shifts, and serves as Cupid. Be sure to enjoy the suicidal tomatoes plunging to their canned goods deaths.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 23, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Retailing, Food, Cartoons, 1940s

Follies of the Madmen #326



1) Sturgeons are the ONLY ones to make caviar, therefore they are best by default, and the point is moot.

2) The mental juxtaposition engendered by this ad between a fishy taste and the taste of coffee is most unpleasant.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Sep 20, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Animals, Business, Advertising, Products, Food, 1940s

Malvaz Malt Tonic

Oh, it's not beer, despite coming from Monarch Brewing--it's just a healthy Malt Tonic!

As this site says of a similar brand from the same period: "the concoction—actually just simple beer with the addition of honey—was advertised as a 'liquid food' for the treatment of various ailments, from insomnia to 'old age' to 'expectant motherhood.'"





Posted By: Paul - Mon Sep 18, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Advertising, 1930s, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #325



Possessed pants try to ward off other occult rivals.



Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 09, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Fashion, 1930s

Orangeine:  Death in a Box



Original ad here.

The deadly chemical in question.

"I was first called to see the patient, a young lady, physically sound, who had been taking Orangeine powders for a number of weeks for insomnia. The rest of the family noticed that she was very blue, and for this reason I was called. When I saw the patient shoe complained of a sense of faintness and inability to keep warm. At this time she had taken a box of six Orangeine powders within about eight hours. She was warned of the danger of continuing the indiscriminate use of the remedy, but insisted that many of her friends had used it and claimed that it was harmless. The family promised to see that she did not obtain any more of the remedy. Three days later, however, I was called to the house and found the patient dead. The family said that she had gone to her room the evening before in her usual health. The next morning, the patient not appearing, they investigated and found her dead. The case was reported to the coroner, and the coroner's verdict was "Death was from the effect of an overdose of Orangeine powders administered by her own hand, whether accidentally or otherwise, unknown to the jury.'"


Full story here.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Sep 03, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Death, Advertising, Patent Medicines, Nostrums and Snake Oil, Nineteenth Century

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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