Category:
Art

Nightmare Hand

Its creator is almost as disturbing.





Full story here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 21, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, New Zealand

The Air-Conditioning Show

In 1966, the art group Art & Language (which, at the time, was Terry Atkinson and Michael Baldwin) debuted the Air-Conditioning Show. This consisted of an air conditioner in an empty room. The only vaguely art-like part of the exhibit (in a conventional sense) was ten sheets of paper pinned to the wall by the door, on which were written line after line of cryptic sentences, such as, "It is obvious that the elements of a given framework (and this includes the constitution of construct contexts) are not at all bound to an eliminative specifying system."

This exhibit is now regarded as a significant moment in the development of modern art. One art historian noted that what made it original was that, "the body of air in a particular gallery space was singled out for art-status." Another says:

Art & Language’s ‘Air Conditioning Show’ (1966-67) was seen as an exploration of our understanding of art institutions and their exhibition spaces; specifically 'the desire to show institutions’ internal mechanisms, here the thermal regulating system for an exhibition space, left empty.’

In a 2012 article in the Independent, Charles Derwent singled it out as, "the moment when the visual arts in Britain were beginning to turn un-visual, when mere visuality was becoming suspect."

The sheets of paper are now preserved at the Tate Museum of Modern Art.



Posted By: Alex - Tue Jul 30, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, 1960s

The Man Who Stole Art

The strange tale of Stéphane Breitweiser, arguably the world's greatest art thief, who managed to steal hundreds of works valued, in total, at well over one billion dollars.

His success was largely attributable to a a loophole in the world of art security: that there's not much security on the front-end (in the museums). Instead, as Michael Finkel notes in a Feb 2019 article in GQ, "art crimes are typically solved on the back end, when the thieves try to sell the work."

And that's why Breitweiser managed to get away with his thefts for so long, because he never tried to sell anything. He stole because he loved the art and wanted to have it for himself, accumulating it all in his mother's house, where he lived.

His case reminds me of Joseph Feldman, who stole over 15,000 books from the New York Public Library, simply because he loved books. It suggests a recurring weird-news theme: thieves who steal not from a profit motive, but instead to indulge their obsessive collecting.

Stéphane Breitweiser

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jul 28, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Art, Crime, Collectors

Ponyhenge



Article here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 27, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Art, Cryptozoology, Eccentrics

Warhol Flies Braniff

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jul 21, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Business, Advertising, Air Travel and Airlines, 1960s

Birch-Bark Suit

Created by Finnish artist Erkki Pekkarinen. There's not a lot of info to be found about him in English on the Internet. But Finland's Contemporary Folk Art Museum offers some:

Pekkarinen has bent bark to make both the largest birch bark shoes in the world (2.7 metres) and the smallest (3.8 millimetres). He is, however, best known for his all-bark ”forest-folk national costume”, which became the emblem of the 2001 ITE exhibition at Meilahti Art Museum in Helsinki. Pekkarinen has given his unfeigned performance in the same suit at many an ITE exhibition opening, wearing bark shoes, bark Stetson and carrying a bark briefcase. He always brings along a collection of smaller bark shoes in a tiny portable showcase.





His giant birch-bark shoes

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 04, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Art, Fashion

Body Paint Animals of Johannes Stötter







His home page, with more videos.

Posted By: Paul - Thu May 23, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Art, Surrealism, Body Painting

Imogene Winchester in LIFE Magazine



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sun May 19, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Art, Body, Human Marvels, Children, 1930s

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 21

Khrushchev definitely would not have approved of this filthy exhibitionism!

Posted By: Paul - Mon May 13, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Statues and Monuments, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, 1920s, Russia

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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