Category:
Art

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 19



Not sure how I'd feel about this sculpture if I were a British woman.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Feb 05, 2019 - Comments (6)
Category: Art, 1940s, 1950s, Europe, Russia

Laetitia Ky’s Hair Sculptures

Not an art form for the follically challenged.

More examples at her Instagram page. Also at cnn.com.






Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 01, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, Hair and Hairstyling

Moodles





The artist's homepage.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jan 25, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, Surrealism

Art Disposal Service

A variation on the weird-news theme of art mistaken for trash -- art purposefully thrown away as trash. From KPBS.org:

In the late '60s, artist John Manno used to park his van in front of chic Los Angeles galleries. It had a large sign on its side that read, “Art Disposal Service.” Manno was there to get rid of unnecessary art. He eventually leased a San Diego franchise of Art Disposal Service to local artist Bob Matheny, who taught in the art department at Southwestern College. Matheny signed a contract, kept the name, and quickly designed a lab coat for himself. For the last 40 years, Matheny, now 84, has tried to get artists, collectors and curators to take their excess art to the dump.

via Esoteric Survey



New York Times - Nov 17, 1968

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jan 09, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Garbage, Trash, Waste and Other Detritus

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 18




Brassaï (Gyula Halász)
Prostitute Undressing
1934-35





Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 08, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Sexuality, 1930s, Russia

Three men with a pole on their head

February 1976: a performance art group calling itself Ddart walked around the Norfolk countryside for a week carrying on their heads a ten foot pole supported by hats resembling ice cream cones. They called this performance 'Circular Walk.' The UK Arts Council paid them £395 for this.

The trio never really explained what the intended meaning of this was, except for the following brief statement later provided by Ray Richards, a member of the group:

The pole was worn for many reasons, one of which was to attract attention... we walked around a huge, 150-mile circumference circle as precisely as possible using existing roads, tracks and pathways - thus creating a gigantic but transient piece of sculpture. The pole was worn at all times whilst walking and each evening we did a short performance about the circular walk in a pub en route.

More controversial was why the Arts Council had paid for it. John Walker, author of Art & Outrage, provides some details:

Adrian Henri, the Liverpool poet, painter and author of Environments and Happenings (19 74), was a member of the Arts Council panel which awarded the grant. He thought it was a small price to pay for three men working twenty-four hours a day to provide a week's entertainment. Henri was one of the few who praised the 'real movement sculpture' on the grounds that it was 'pure and beautiful'. David Archer, publican of the Ferry Inn, Reedham, disagreed: he described Ddart's ten minute act as 'an up and down thing without music' which left him and his 15 customers cold.

Image source: Art & Outrage

Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 29, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, 1970s

Curiosa

In addition to creating works of his own, artist Barton Lidice Benes collected random, weird stuff, which is detailed in his 2002 book Curiosa: Celebrity Relics, Historical Fossils, and Other Metamorphic Rubbish. Seems like it could be of interest to WUvies! Some of the items include:

  • Larry Hagman’s gallstone
  • a straw used by Monica Lewinsky
  • a statue of the Virgin Mary made out of dollar bills
  • a penny found in Sigmund Freud’s couch
  • a piece of coal from the Titanic
  • a cross made out of nails from the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas
  • a fork used by actor Steven Van Zandt of The Sopranos
  • Gore Vidal’s swizzle stick and coaster
  • Art Buchwald’s toothpick
After Benes died in 2012, the North Dakota Museum of Art received much of his collection.

More info: wikipedia, poz.com

Posted By: Alex - Thu Dec 27, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Collectors

Céleste Boursier-Mougenot

I believe we've seen the birds-and-guitars piece before, but not the others.







His Wikipedia page.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Dec 26, 2018 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Museums, Music, Europe, Cacophony, Dissonance, White Noise and Other Sonic Assaults

Karina Smigla-Bobinski



The artist's homepage.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 22, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Europe

Stanisław Szukalski



Stanisław Szukalski was a painter and sculptor who also developed the pseudoscientific historical theory of Zermatism, positing that all human culture was derived from a post-deluge Easter Island and that mankind was locked in an eternal struggle with the Sons of the Yeti. He illustrated this theory in his works.


Article source.

Artist's homepage.




Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 13, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Outsider Art, War, Documentaries, Bohemians, Beatniks, Hippies and Slackers, Europe, Twentieth Century

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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