Category:
Babies and Toddlers

The Gro-Clock

Thanks god I'm not a parent! Not only the headaches, but the expense! $54.99!





Posted By: Paul - Sat May 27, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Technology, Babies and Toddlers

Happy



Wikipedia article here.

Another, lesser-known, candidate for "Worst TV Show Ever." As a critic said at the time:

image

Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 17, 2016 - Comments (3)
Category: Television, Babies and Toddlers, Fantasy, 1960s

Giant Baby Heads



Full story here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 06, 2016 - Comments (4)
Category: Art, Babies and Toddlers

License Plates for Strollers

Back in 2006, Jill Starishevsky started a business selling license plates for strollers. The idea was that when your nanny was out with the baby in the stroller, people could anonymously report on her behavior (whether good or bad) via the website, HowsMyNanny.com, listed on the plate. So kinda like those "How's my driving?" signs on the back of trucks.

Her site is no longer active. It lasted until 2009, and has now been replaced by a spam site. But the original site is preserved on the Web Archive.

I see two problems with her business plan. First, her customer base was limited to people with nannies. And second, I don't think the purpose of the license plate would have been evident to your average member of the public.

HowsMyNanny.com screenshot

Posted By: Alex - Fri May 06, 2016 - Comments (4)
Category: Signage, Babies and Toddlers

Baby’s burps predict his future

Back in 1964, Dr. Milton Berger called attention to the predictive power of a baby's burps. A baby with "strong and clear" burps will grow up to be a leader. However, the majority of people are "dithering" burpers. They'll become your run-of-the-mill member of the faceless masses.

Odd theory, but probably as good a predictor of future success as anything.

The Fresno Bee - Aug 21, 1964

Posted By: Alex - Sat Feb 20, 2016 - Comments (5)
Category: Babies, Predictions, Babies and Toddlers, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #268

image

This was one of a series of postwar ads for magnesium, which illustrated how the miracle metal would allow consumers to do things nobody would ever want to do, like carry a baby carriage on your shoulder.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Dec 21, 2015 - Comments (8)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Technology, Babies and Toddlers, 1940s

Wee tot sent to prison, 1906

Harsh justice in Switzerland.

Could this boy perhaps have been the youngest person ever convicted of a crime and sent to jail?

The Minneapolis Journal - Nov 18, 1906



Wee Tot Sent To Prison
Three-year-old Swiss is convicted as a thief.

Geneva, Nov. 17 — The Swiss public and press are aroused at the extraordinary action of a magistrate presiding at the criminal sessions at Weinfelden in the commune of Thurgoirs, who has sentenced a child barely 3 years of age to three and a half months' imprisonment for "theft."
The child, who is the son of a laborer, saw some penny toys dangling from the doorway of a shop. He seized two of them, and took them home, and an hour later was "arrested" by a tall gendarme on a charge of theft.
When the case was called at Weinfelden the child had to be carried by a gendarme, as he could not be seen over the top of the dock.
In response to the magistrate's questions the little fellow laughingly admitted that he took the toys. He could not speak plainly, and it was with difficulty that the gendarme, who acted as intermediary, was made to understand that he wanted them "as he did not have any toys like other boys."
"Three and a half months' imprisonment," said the magistrate sternly.
The boy's parents fell on their knees before the magistrate, and pleaded with him to remit the sentence on account of his tender age and his inability to distinguish between right and wrong. The magistrate declined to revise the sentence, however, and said "Remove the prisoner."
The gendarme, who was much affected, carried the child out of the dock and placed him in the arms of an astonished warder.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Nov 08, 2015 - Comments (8)
Category: Prisons, Babies and Toddlers, 1900s

TV Set or Child?

The Williams family would have preferred a new TV set, but they got stuck with a kid instead. All because of the neighbors.


Source: Galesburg Register-Mail - Dec 28, 1959

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jun 07, 2015 - Comments (8)
Category: Television, Babies and Toddlers, 1950s

Baby Cage

Problem: It's hard to travel with a baby.

Solution: build a portable cage to carry your kid in. I wonder if the TSA would approve of these. Source: Illustrated World (Mar 1920).


Posted By: Alex - Sat Jan 24, 2015 - Comments (7)
Category: Babies, Family, Babies and Toddlers, Parents, 1920s

Spontaneous Baby Combustion Mystifies Doctors

He's caught on fire four different times. The theory is this baby is emitting combustible gas from his pores.

image

Here's the link to the story:

http://www.kmbz.com/Doctors-Investigate-Indian-Baby-for-Spontaneous-Co/17128142

Even worse news? The family has been banned from the village since neighbors are afraid their houses will get burned down.

Posted By: gdanea - Fri Aug 23, 2013 - Comments (5)
Category: Babies and Toddlers

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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