Category:
Cannibalism

Shore Dinner



It's worth clicking through to appreciate the expressions on the people, at larger size.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Oct 07, 2016 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Cannibalism, Food, Myths and Fairytales, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #279

image

[Click to enlarge]

No chipmunks, crickets, rabbits, or fat, slack-jawed, beanie-wearing yokels were actually diced and cooked for these recipes.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Apr 06, 2016 - Comments (10)
Category: Cannibalism, Food, Cartoons, 1980s

Human Flesh Cure

The 1999 film Ravenous (starring Guy Pearce and Robert Carlyle) is about cannibalism. It's loosely inspired by the stories of the Donner Party and Alferd Packer. But it also includes the idea that eating human flesh can cure any wound or disease.

I was reminded of that film when I came across this real-life case, from 1932, of someone trying the human-flesh cure, apparently successfully. But I wonder why the husband fed his wife only a third of his thigh steak? What did he do with the rest? Does eating too much human flesh turn someone into a vampire?

The Des Moines Register - Dec 25, 1932



In Fukuoka prefecture, Japan, banking on the superstition that to eat of human flesh cures all ills, a Korean whose wife had neuralgia cut a half-pound slice of flesh off his thigh, cut the slice in three parts, cooked one part, fed it to his wife, telling her it was rabbit. His wife improved; he went to the government hospital with an infected thigh.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Mar 11, 2016 - Comments (7)
Category: Cannibalism, Medicine, 1930s

How to Cook Husbands

image

Alas, I wanted this 1898 book to be a tract by an angry feminist cannibal, but it is not--as you can see for yourself, if you go here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 22, 2015 - Comments (4)
Category: Cannibalism, Feminism, Food, Books, Nineteenth Century

He’ll Just Be Hungry Again In An Hour

An unfortunate Chinese woman who failed to answer her estranged husband's 2am phone call got a surprise visit at work the next day. The husband showed up and in a fit of temper bit her nose off and swallowed it. Due to the tissue being unrecoverable it will be at least 3 months before any reconstructive surgery can be done for her.

Posted By: patty - Thu Sep 10, 2015 - Comments (1)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Cannibalism, Husbands, Can't Possibly Be True, Face and Facial Expressions, Eating

Placenta Smoothies



Unsafe for Revulsion-prone Stomachs.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Mar 22, 2015 - Comments (4)
Category: Body, Blood, Cannibalism, Eccentrics, Fads, Food

Pro Basketball Player Eaten by Cannibals?

image

Vanished forever in Africa while visiting Idi Amin. Surname suspiciously close to "brisket." 'Nuff said.

Contemporary account from 1985.

Article from 2007.

Wikipedia.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 16, 2014 - Comments (8)
Category: Cannibalism, Sports, 1980s, Africa

Sunglasses for Chickens

Invented in 1937 to control cannibalism among chickens. Apparently chickens have a natural instinct to peck each other, but the sight of blood intensifies this instinct. So much so that if one chicken has blood on its feathers, all the others in the flock will peck it to death. This was a real problem for farmers until these rose-colored chicken sunglasses came along, which made it hard for the chickens to see the sight of blood. Nowadays, farmers must have other solutions to the problem of chicken cannibalism, because these glasses are no longer manufactured and are considered collector's items. (National Band and Tag via Feathered Forager)

chicken glasses

Posted By: Alex - Mon Apr 02, 2012 - Comments (6)
Category: Animals, Farming, Cannibalism, Fashion

Fijian Cannibal Forks

If you're ever at a dinner party where the host has a set of forks that look like these, you might want to consider leaving, quickly.

These are Fijian "cannibal forks" used for eating human flesh. The iron dance blog offers this description of them:

The cannibal fork, or iculanibokola, was used by attendants during ritual feasts to feed individuals considered too holy to touch food. These forks arose for several reasons. First is a cultural taboo that prohibits chiefs and priests from touching food with their hands. Common Fijians generally did not use utensils until Europeanization. One of the most important ceremonies a chieftain participated in was the devouring of their or the tribes enemy. Combining the significance of the event and the inability to use their hands the chiefs needed a way to participate-hence the development of the cannibal fork. Forks became a way to show power and influence. The fancier more elaborate the fork, the higher status the owner had.

Fijian cannibal forks are still made, to sell to tourists. What the tourists use them for... I guess that's their own business.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Feb 15, 2012 - Comments (6)
Category: Cannibalism, Food, Rituals and Superstitions

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

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