Category:
Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Miss Fluffy Rice

She was an animated corporate mascot, but her name also alluded to all the "miss" titles popular at the time. Thankfully the ad men didn't put her in a bikini. Though she is topless, which is a bit risqué.

Ladies' Home Journal - Feb 1962



Oakdale Journal - Sep 10, 1959

Posted By: Alex - Sun Feb 04, 2024 - Comments (2)
Category: Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1960s

Hubert the Goober

In the early 1950s, McColl's Fine Foods adopted 'Hubert the Goober' as the mascot for its peanut butter. But by the late 1950s, it had dropped him.

Thanks to Hubert, I just learned that a 'goober' originally meant a peanut before it came to mean a foolish person. Apparently it's a Southern term. Maybe that's the reason Hubert didn't last long as a corporate mascot. McColl's was a Canadian company, and how many people in Canada would have known that a goober was a peanut?

More info: A Legume With Many Names: The Story Of 'Goober'; Historical Information Service

Vancouver Sun - Apr 21, 1951



image source: eBay Canada



Posted By: Alex - Thu Feb 01, 2024 - Comments (9)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1950s

Rancher Glen, the Christmas Seal Cowboy

I'm a little late with this seasonal entry, but I still hope all WU-vies can follow Rancher Glen's advice for a healthy 2024.



Posted By: Paul - Sun Jan 07, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Health, PSA’s, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Children, Wild West and US Frontier, Twentieth Century

Phil A. O’Fish

In the 1970s, McDonalds introduced many of its well-known corporate mascots such as the Hamburgerlar, Mayor McCheese, and Ronald McDonald. It also debuted Phil A. O'Fish who, for some reason, disappeared less than a year after being introduced.

I wonder what Phil did wrong to get dropped so quickly.

More info: Smithsonian Magazine

flickr.com



Washington Court House Record-Herald - Mar 18, 1976



Posted By: Alex - Tue Sep 05, 2023 - Comments (1)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1970s

Meet Mr. Frib

Mr. Frib, the friendly corporate mascot for asbestos insulation.

Personnel Management and Methods - Mar 1958

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 13, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1950s

Krylon Man

I wonder if Krylon Man is supposed to be sentient. He has a nozzle instead of a head, but he's guided by some kind of instinct to press his nozzle and release his contents.

I also wonder if they tried putting a head on him but decided that he looked better with just a nozzle.

You can buy a screen print of Krylon Man for $25 and hang him on your wall.

Life - Sep 23, 1975

Posted By: Alex - Wed Nov 30, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1950s

Bad Frog Beer

Can you guess why Bad Frog Beer was banned in New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and North Carolina? The answer is below in extended.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Fri Oct 15, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1990s, Alcohol

Buckeye Beer

The revitalized company still exists today, but no mention of reinstating their "mascots," Buck and Billy.

Read the history here.





Posted By: Paul - Fri May 14, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Human Marvels, Regionalism, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, Alcohol

Little Mr. Tritium

The Japanese government recently created an animated character that definitely belongs in our ongoing series of strange spokesbeings. It was a "cute fish-like creature with rosy cheeks" that was intended to represent a radioactive hydrogen isotope. The government was hoping that this creature would help gain public support for its plan of releasing contaminated water from Fukushima into the sea.

While the government didn't give this creature a name, people have been calling it "Little Mr. Tritium".

More info: The Guardian



Posted By: Alex - Tue Apr 27, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Government, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters

Mary Mild

Disney released Mary Poppins in 1964. The next year Ivory Liquid Soap debuted a new mascot: Mary Mild, a flying maid. Seems like an obvious Mary Poppins rip-off to me, though I can't find the similarity mentioned anywhere.

Mary Mild didn't last long. Within two years, Ivory had canned her.

The ads below ran in 1966 in magazines such as Ladies Home Journal and Good Housekeeping.





Posted By: Alex - Mon Jan 18, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1960s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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