Category:
Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Peter Pain Parody

Alex and I never coordinate our posts, but sometimes they achieve thematic synchronicity. Yesterday, for instance, he posted about losing weight and I posted about obesity.

But his post from today, about Corporate Icon Peter Pain, happened magically to dovetail with my leisure-time reading of last evening, when I was enjoying THE THING FROM THE GRAVE, a collection of the work that artist Joe Orlando did for the fabled EC Comics. I read Orlando's Peter Pain Parody, and then this morning found Alex's post!

BTW: the whole line of EC reprints from Fantagraphics is worthy of your attention.



Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 05, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Comics, Homages, Pastiches, Tributes and Borrowings, 1950s, Parody, Pain, Self-inflicted and Otherwise

Peter Pain

Continuing our ongoing theme of strange corporate mascots: Peter Pain was the villainous mascot of Ben-Gay from 1942 to 1965. He's not to be confused with the British judge named Peter Pain. (or the dentist Dr. Pain).

NY Herald Tribune - 1946 (via Duke Library)



Some more info about him from The Austin American (Oct 13, 1965):

The arch villain with the jaunty black bowler and gnashing teeth made his debut 23 years ago [1942] in a series of comic strips ads for Ben-Gay ointment. He delighted his readers by making life miserable for a succession of poor unsuspecting souls.

Peter Pain's behavior remained steadfast — he was rotten to the core. In his heyday, he threw a kleig light at a television quiz kid, pounded an umbrella into the back of a grandfather celebrating his 50th wedding anniversary, clouted a sweet little old lady with a hammer and spike and turned his pitchfork on the stomach of a nice young farmgirl.

Despite the mayhem, every adventure invariably ended happily. In each strip, someone would reach for the Ben-Gay and in no time the aches and pains of the harried souls would disappear.

"Drat, Ben-Gay," was Peter Pain's frequent lament as the episode came to an end.

Now, with the introduction of a new product (Ben-Gay Lotion), it has been announced, with regret, that the services of Peter Pain will no longer be used.

"We decided Peter Pain is not a fun guy," a Ben-Gay spokesman explained.


Chicago Tribune Magazine - 1953 (via Duke)



Austin American - Oct 13, 1965



Update: After posting this, I noticed that Paul had previously posted a Peter Pain ad in his Follies of the Madmen series (#404).

Posted By: Alex - Thu Dec 05, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Follies of the Madmen #452



Nothing like adding a sex element to simple juvenile love of chocolate.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Nov 11, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Contests, Races and Other Competitions, Sexuality, Chocolate, 1950s

The Life Cereal Protein Spokes-creature

Most cereal spokes-beings are identifiable characters: leprechauns, toucans, sea captains. But this character for Life Cereal is apparently a Protein.



Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 02, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Food

Follies of the Madmen #437



1) A bicycle tire confusingly has the same name as a razor blade company.

2) The mascot for the tire is a hyper-dimensional polar bear. These creatures apparently represent all that is desirable in a tire.

3) Even with its magic powers, the hyper-dimensional polar bear does not act to save the victim directly, but makes the human boy do all the work.

4) Moral: buy our tires to avoid snake bites?

Source (page 20).

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jul 28, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Accidents, Anthropomorphism, Bicycles and Other Human-powered Vehicles, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Comics

B. Prosperous

Continuing our ongoing theme of strange corporate mascots:

From 1960-1962, B. Prosperous was the mascot of the Eastern Trust Company. He demonstrates a popular trend among mid-twentieth-century mascot creators, which was to slap a human head and limbs onto some inanimate object and call it a mascot.

Montreal Gazette - Mar 22, 1961

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jul 02, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1960s

Jerry Pulls the Strings



Imperious coffee magnate is wooed by his future son-in-law's puppets.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Apr 02, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Puppets and Automatons, Coffee and other Legal Stimulants, Marriage, 1930s, Love & Romance

Follies of the Madmen #407



"Murray Westgate portrays an Esso service station dealer who asks a woman driver if she wants Esso Extra gasoline, but she only wants her windows cleaned."

Not sure if Murray peeved attitude conveys the right message. Also, perhaps a bit too much thrilling window-scrubbing action?

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jan 21, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Motor Vehicles, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #404



Not entirely sure why any company would emphasize the sufferings of its "antagonist" so dramatically. It would be like saying, "Poor germs! Doctors are killing them all!"

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jan 02, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1940s, Pain, Self-inflicted and Otherwise, Fictional Monsters

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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