Category:
Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Newt Kook

Hard to believe that the largest-selling bourbon was once touted by a fellow named "Newt Kook."

This timeline of Dant's history makes no mention of Newt. And Google comes up empty for any biographical particulars. Could he have been a fake, a corporate icon like "Betty Crocker?"

This January 30 1956 report from BROADCASTING MAGAZINE seems to say otherwise. Although who knows who was on the other end of the phone?






Original ad here.





Original ad here.





Posted By: Paul - Wed Apr 12, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #306



Tiny, tiny Cigarette Elf delivers tobacco goodness!

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 08, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Tobacco and Smoking, 1940s

Just Imagine



The uproarious laughter by the human executive at the antics of Tommy Telephone, a plainly impossible vision, proclaims that the fellow is gratefully descending into the dark swamp of insanity due to the high stresses of his job.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 10, 2016 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Communications, Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination, Technology, Telephones, Cartoons, Stop-motion Animation, 1940s, Brain Damage

Cora Gated

The Box Vox blog offers a detailed history of Cora Gated, who was the corporate mascot adopted by Hinde & Dauch (a box maker) in the 1950s. She was a woman wearing only a corrugated box. Or was she somehow supposed to be a box that had become a woman?

Gastonia Gazette - Aug 23, 1955


It turns out that Cora Gated was also the stage name of a burlesque dancer during the 1970s. Her tag line was, "The laminated delight. CORA GATED. She'll wrap you around her finger!"

Kansas City Times - Jul 22, 1972



Kansas City Times - Jul 21, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Sat Oct 01, 2016 - Comments (3)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

X-Ray Stove Polish

image

"Cannot explode." Well, that's a relief!

Some more info here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu May 05, 2016 - Comments (7)
Category: Technology, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Appliances, 1900s

Bill Ding

Continuing Paul's ongoing theme of strange corporate mascots — "Bill Ding" was a corporate mascot, created circa 1950, and shared by a number of building supply stores. But was he a giant robot, a wooden puppet, or a walking/talking building? I'm not sure.

Seems to me he's gotta rank as one of the laziest efforts ever to come up with a corporate mascot. I mean, Bill Ding. Really? (Though, to be fair, he's better than Clippy, the Microsoft Office mascot).

The name wasn't even original, since Bill Ding was also the name of a popular children's toy, Bill Ding the Balancing Clown, introduced in 1931.

Pottstown Mercury - May 24, 1950



Lethbridge Herald - Jan 31, 1950



Bernardsville News - Feb 16, 1950



Update: Thanks to Bill G. for sending along a picture of some Bill Ding Balancing Clowns.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Mar 24, 2016 - Comments (7)
Category: Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

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