Category:
Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Follies of the Madmen #306



Tiny, tiny Cigarette Elf delivers tobacco goodness!

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 08, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Tobacco and Smoking, 1940s

Just Imagine



The uproarious laughter by the human executive at the antics of Tommy Telephone, a plainly impossible vision, proclaims that the fellow is gratefully descending into the dark swamp of insanity due to the high stresses of his job.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 10, 2016 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Communications, Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination, Technology, Telephones, Cartoons, Stop-motion Animation, 1940s, Brain Damage

Cora Gated

The Box Vox blog offers a detailed history of Cora Gated, who was the corporate mascot adopted by Hinde & Dauch (a box maker) in the 1950s. She was a woman wearing only a corrugated box. Or was she somehow supposed to be a box that had become a woman?

Gastonia Gazette - Aug 23, 1955


It turns out that Cora Gated was also the stage name of a burlesque dancer during the 1970s. Her tag line was, "The laminated delight. CORA GATED. She'll wrap you around her finger!"

Kansas City Times - Jul 22, 1972



Kansas City Times - Jul 21, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Sat Oct 01, 2016 - Comments (3)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

X-Ray Stove Polish

image

"Cannot explode." Well, that's a relief!

Some more info here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu May 05, 2016 - Comments (7)
Category: Technology, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Appliances, 1900s

Bill Ding

Continuing Paul's ongoing theme of strange corporate mascots — "Bill Ding" was a corporate mascot, created circa 1950, and shared by a number of building supply stores. But was he a giant robot, a wooden puppet, or a walking/talking building? I'm not sure.

Seems to me he's gotta rank as one of the laziest efforts ever to come up with a corporate mascot. I mean, Bill Ding. Really? (Though, to be fair, he's better than Clippy, the Microsoft Office mascot).

The name wasn't even original, since Bill Ding was also the name of a popular children's toy, Bill Ding the Balancing Clown, introduced in 1931.

Pottstown Mercury - May 24, 1950



Lethbridge Herald - Jan 31, 1950



Bernardsville News - Feb 16, 1950



Update: Thanks to Bill G. for sending along a picture of some Bill Ding Balancing Clowns.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Mar 24, 2016 - Comments (7)
Category: Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Mystery Illustration 13

image

Which corporation--still around today--felt that this technological monster symbolized all the services they provided, back in 1969?

The answer is here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 25, 2015 - Comments (7)
Category: Technology, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1960s

Early Michelin Man

The Michelin Man (aka Bibendum) looked a lot stranger in his early incarnations.







via Business Insider

Posted By: Alex - Sat Nov 07, 2015 - Comments (8)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

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