Category:
Hospitals

Josiah Oldfield, the Fruitarian Hospital and Kissing

Fruitarianism is a kind of vegetarian practice which today seems very strict. But 100 years ago, when Josiah Oldfield practiced it, there was more variety allowed in the diet.

Oldfield advocated for fruitarianism, putting him at odds with the Vegetarian Society.[16] He was a member of the Fruitarian Society, whose members lived on "the produce of harvest field, garden, forest and orchard, with milk, butter, cheese, eggs and honey".[6] His own "fruitarianism" was close to ovo-lacto vegetarianism. He was not a vegan: he recommended a daily diet of dandelion leaves, eggs, grapes, honey, lettuce, milk, salad, and watercress.


In any case, Oldfield founded several hospitals whose healing methods involved this diet. See the video below for more details. I have no idea of their success rate.

However, he found time to theorize about other things besides diet, such as the art of kissing. I apologize for the illegibility of the snapshot. Here's a sample or two of the text.





Newpaper source: Omaha Sunday Bee-News (Omaha, Nebraska) 30 Aug 1931, Sun Page 41





Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 01, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Hospitals, Hygiene, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, Love & Romance

Living in an Abandoned Hospital

This instance can't quite fit into the UNAUTHORIZED DWELLINGS series, since it's authorized. But close enough to be weird!

Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 30, 2021 - Comments ()
Category: Domestic, Hospitals, United Kingdom

Jackson Barnett, “The World’s Richest Indian”



From Wikipedia:
With the discovery of oil on Barnett's lands in 1912, a series of court actions by interested parties litigated the control of Barnett's trust. Barnett was declared incompetent and denied access to his affairs simply because he only spoke the Muscogee Creek language and not English. Barnett was permitted a modest income and was installed in a house near Henryetta. In 1919 the courts allowed the diversion of money from Barnett's trust to the construction of the "Jackson Barnett Hospital" in Henryetta. In 1920 Barnett, then in his seventies, married Anna Laura Lowe (1881-1952), a fortune hunter whom he had met only once before. The couple had to marry in Kansas after a marriage license was denied in Oklahoma. Barnett's guardians were unable to annul the marriage and the hospital plans were never pursued. Instead, the trust was divided between Anna Barnett and Bacone Indian College.[3]

The Barnetts moved to Los Angeles and bought a mansion on Wilshire Boulevard, where Jackson passed his time directing traffic at a nearby intersection. Legal actions continued from 1923 to 1929, which provoked congressional hearings on the role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in establishing and administering the Barnett trust and others like it. The hearings led to criticism of BIA administrator Charles H. Burke's actions, and during the 1930s, to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. In 1927 Barnett v. Equitable again proclaimed Jackson Barnett incompetent in federal court. In March 1934 another federal ruling annulled the Barnetts' marriage and Anna Barnett's rights to Jackson's trust on the grounds that Jackson had been "kidnapped" by a woman of suspect moral character, but allowed Anna to act as Jackson's caretaker. Jackson Barnett died on 29 May 1934 of natural causes: allegations that Anna had poisoned him were found to be false.[3][4]

Anna was finally evicted from the Wilshire Boulevard residence after four years, even though she had gained significant support from Los Angeles society,[5] including Los Angeles District Attorney Burton Fitts and California Governor Frank Merriam. Anna had to be tear-gassed after she threw a hatchet during the eviction,[5] and lived the remainder of her life with a daughter while unsuccessfully attempting to regain a share of the Barnett estate, which amounted to $3.5 million in 1934 ($55.4 million estimated value in 2012 dollars).




Source.



Lots more info here.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Nov 10, 2019 - Comments ()
Category: Crime, Unauthorized Dwellings, Forgotten Figures and Where Are They Now?, Frauds, Cons and Scams, Government, Hospitals, Twentieth Century, Native Americans, Weddings

They Died Laughing

image

[Click to enlarge]

Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 22, 2016 - Comments (5)
Category: Death, Hospitals, 1970s, Goofs and Screw-ups

BIG-CAT SCAN

image
A lion getting a CAT scan!

Posted By: patty - Sat Mar 21, 2015 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Hospitals, Medicine

Cigarette Karaoke



Plus, millions of free cigarettes for our hospitalized fighting men!

Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 26, 2013 - Comments (14)
Category: Addictions, Business, Advertising, Hospitals, Television, Smoking and Tobacco, 1950s

Mayo Buckner, the man who was sane

Back in 1890, when Darthula Buckner was pregnant with her son Mayo, she saw a blind piano player named Blind Boone perform. She found it frightening the way Blind Boone rolled his eyes, and she grew to believe that somehow Blind Boone had imprinted his influence on the child inside her. Because as Mayo was growing up, sometimes he too rolled his eyes. Mayo was also a bit shy, and he ate his food fast. This was too much for his mother, who decided he needed "special management" and took him, at the age of 8, to the Iowa Home for Feeble-Minded Children.


Blind Boone

An official at the institute (but not a doctor) took one look at Mayo and declared he was a "medium-grade imbecile." And so began Mayo's new life as an inmate in a mental institute.

When he reached adulthood, Mayo frequently told the doctors that he felt he was perfectly sane and would like to leave. But this request was always denied. And since he was so often told he was feeble-minded, he eventually came to believe it.

Until a new superintendent arrived at the school, tested Mayo, and told him that not only was he perfectly sane, but he also had a higher-than-average IQ of 120. So he was free to leave.

But by that time it was 1957 and Mayo was 67 years old. He had nowhere to go, so he decided to stay. He died there in 1965.

Read more about the strange life of Mayo Buckner in this Life magazine article from Mar 24, 1958.


Mayo Buckner

Posted By: Alex - Wed Feb 20, 2013 - Comments (6)
Category: Hospitals, Intelligence

Fixed

"Fixed" 2010 from Jeffrey Thompson on Vimeo.



Sometimes it's better to remain an untreated patient.

Posted By: Paul - Wed May 11, 2011 - Comments (1)
Category: Health, Hospitals, Humor, Cartoons

Guns Don’t Kill People

But I can't say the same for these doctors.



Guns, Doctors and all around weirdness in one place!

Posted By: Nethie - Wed Sep 15, 2010 - Comments (5)
Category: Death, Entertainment, Guns, Hospitals, Humor, Medicine, Video, Violence, Goofs and Screw-ups

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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