Category:
Mayonnaise

Aspic Aquarium

I agree with Hellmann's that this would look cool as a centerpiece at a party. But serving it with mayonnaise? Even as a mayonnaise lover, I'm not sure about that.

Life - May 23, 1960

Posted By: Alex - Sat May 02, 2020 - Comments (7)
Category: Mayonnaise, 1960s

Sliced Mayonnaise

We recently reported that a Japanese company was selling a mayonnaise-flavored ice cream bar. Now more mayonnaise news has arrived from Japan.

The Japanese company Bourbon (which, despite its name, is not involved in the alcohol industry) has introduced sliced mayonnaise, describing it as a “sheet-like condiment.” It's advertised as a time-saver for those wanting to prepare a quick sandwich.

More info: Sora News

Posted By: Alex - Thu Mar 12, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise

The Most Useful Mayonnaise

How useful is your mayonnaise? Not as useful as Durkee's!

San Francisco Examiner - Aug 21, 1927



San Francisco Examiner - July 3, 1927

Posted By: Alex - Thu Mar 05, 2020 - Comments (5)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise, Advertising, 1920s

Mayonnaise-Flavored Ice Cream

Over in Japan, Morinaga Milk Industry has recently started selling a mayonnaise-flavored ice cream bar. It goes by the name “Calorie Monster Cherio Creamy Mayonnaise Flavor.” So, I assume it's not in any way a diet food.

The bar is said to have a white-chocolate center surrounded by the mayonnaise-flavored ice cream, all encased in a shell of white chocolate and cookie crumbs.

I'd try it.

More info: SoraNews24



This actually isn't the first time mayo-flavored ice cream has been offered for sale. Last year, ICE, an artisan ice cream shop in Falkirk, Scotland, debuted Hellmann’s Real Mayonnaise ice cream. The store’s owner, Kyle Gentleman, described it as a “full on hit of fat and cream followed with an eggy milky aftertaste.”

Posted By: Alex - Tue Oct 01, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise

The Mayonnaise Lady

In 1973, UC Davis fired Doris Judd from her job as a sandwich maker in the school's cafeteria, citing her "failure to spread mayonnaise to the edges of sandwich bread." Her supervisors also complained that she was slow putting sauerkraut on hot dogs, and had once made too many sloppy joes, which then had to be thrown out.

Judd subsequently sued the university for unlawful termination, arguing that the real reason she was fired was because the university was trying to save money by eliminating older workers. In the ensuing media coverage, she was nicknamed the "Mayonnaise Lady."

The judge agreed with her, remarking that the charges against her seemed "trivial" and ordered that she be rehired. Back on the job, she was assigned to work the grill, rather than sandwich duty. But apparently she didn't stay long, retiring soon after with the money from the settlement.



via Center for Sacramento History



More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Sat May 04, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Lawsuits, Mayonnaise, 1970s

Limited edition mayonnaise jar

Duke's mayonnaise is celebrating 100 years in business by selling limited edition glass jars of its mayonnaise — as opposed to those plastic jars all condiments come in nowadays.

Duke's has rather passionate followers. It's some kind of Southern thing. Southerners LOVE their mayonnaise, especially mayonnaise and tomato sandwiches. And Duke's is held in high regard as being the premier Southern mayonnaise. I've had it, and I agree it's pretty good. It's not a sweet mayonnaise. In fact, it has no sugar in it at all. It's like Hellmanns, but a bit tangier.

Anyway, some people love the stuff so much that they've arranged for their ashes to be stored in a Duke's jar after their death. So if you order the limited-edition jar, that's one thing to do with it once you've eaten the mayo.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jul 31, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Death, Food, Mayonnaise

The Mayonnaise diet

What exactly is the mayonnaise diet? Googling the term produces various vague references to such a thing, but no specifics. So, like the Dial-A-Dietitian, I have no idea what this diet involves... beyond a lot of mayonnaise and eggs.

My guess is that it was either an alternative name for the Atkins Diet, or an eccentric variant of it, since the book Dr. Atkins' Diet Revolution first came out in 1972, which makes the timing about right for this person inquiring about a mayonnaise diet in 1974.

Honolulu Star Bulletin - June 19, 1974

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 13, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise, Dieting and Weight Loss

I Hate Mayonnaise Club

Honolulu columnist Charles Memminger founded the Worldwide I Hate Mayonnaise Club in 1988. Its purpose was to spread the gospel of mayonnaise hatred. It did so by circulating quotations such as, "Mayonnaise, like hollandaise, was invented by the French to cover up the flavour of spoiled flesh, stale vegetables, rotten fish."

Member's would receive an official certificate that they could frame and put on their wall.

I'm not sure if the club is active any more. Its website (nomayo.com) is dead, though you can check out an archived copy of it at archive.org.

Perhaps all the members saw the light and realized that mayonnaise is the greatest food ever.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Aug 15, 2015 - Comments (8)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise

Banana and Mayonnaise Sandwiches

I recently learned that banana and mayonnaise sandwiches are considered a southern delicacy. A variant is the peanut butter and mayonnaise sandwich. Or combining all three: the peanut butter, banana, and mayonnaise sandwich.

There's a Facebook community dedicated to Banana and Mayonnaise Sandwiches. Also, this is apparently one of Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s favorite foods.

The Garden & Gun blog traces the popularity of peanut butter and mayo sandwiches (and presumably also of banana and mayo) back to the Great Depression:

Through the hardships of the Great Depression and the lean years that followed, peanut butter and mayonnaise kept many struggling households afloat. They were also the ingredients in a sandwich that was once as popular as peanut butter and jelly in parts of the South...
Newspaper clippings from the national heyday of the peanut butter and mayonnaise sandwich, a period that seems to have begun in the 1930s and continued through the 1960s, provide evidence that the practice of adding mayonnaise to peanut butter could have originated as a way of transforming rough-hewn nut butters into spreadable pastes.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jul 22, 2015 - Comments (14)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise Flow Rate

As you eat your sandwich, you probably never realized all the science that went into it. Because, of course, some researcher had to study exactly how the mayonnaise flows off your knife onto the bread. [wiley.com]

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jun 30, 2013 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, Mayonnaise, Science





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