Category:
Police and Other Law Enforcement

Decoy Santas

Arizona Daily Star - Dec 10, 1976

Posted By: Alex - Sun Dec 25, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Crime, Police and Other Law Enforcement, 1970s, Christmas

Motorway Snooker

In his book Bobby on the Beat, former London policeman Bob Dixon described the game of motorway (or traffic) snooker:

A practice that was occasionally talked about in police canteens was the game of snooker, not table snooker but "traffic snooker". This was a game specifically played by lads in the traffic division, the dreaded speed cops whose main work consisted of dealing with traffic accidents but who also reported motorists for speeding offences. The game the officers played consisted of scoring points, as in table snooker, the numbers depending on the colours of the cars they had reported for speeding during their shift — for example, a red car scored 1 point, a yellow 2 points, and so on, with a black one scoring the maximum 7 points. At the end of a shift, the traffic cars on the division would return to the police garage and the crews totted up their points to find the winner. I never heard what the prize was.

Over the years some drivers have filed complaints, claiming to have been victims of motorway snooker.

Sydney Morning Herald - Sep 11, 1999



Of course, the official position of the British traffic police is that their officers would not engage in such frivolous games. But that even if they did, all the cars they stopped were speeding anyway.

The Herts and Essex Observer - Jan 16, 1992



More info: BBC News

Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 24, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Games, Police and Other Law Enforcement, Cars

The Bull Bowl

As the season for College Bowl games arrives, let us always fondly recall the "Bull Bowl: Pigs vs. Freaks."

Full account here.









Posted By: Paul - Sun Dec 18, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Police and Other Law Enforcement, Rivalries, Feuds and Grudges, Sports, Bohemians, Beatniks, Hippies and Slackers, 1970s

The Blonde And Her Companion

Back in the 1950s, the FBI used "a curvaceous blue-eyed blonde, wearing a form-fitting sweater" to help train its agents to improve their powers of observation. The lesson was that if they spent too much time looking at her, they might miss other important details, such as her companion, "public enemy No. 11."

Reminds me of the "woman in the red dress" featured in the agent-training-program scene in The Matrix. I wonder if the Wachowskis had heard of the "blonde and her companion" test.

San Bernardino County Sun - Dec 4, 1955



Posted By: Alex - Sat Nov 26, 2022 - Comments (8)
Category: Police and Other Law Enforcement, 1950s, Eyes and Vision

Follies of the Madmen #537

Police brutality!



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jul 11, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Hygiene, Police and Other Law Enforcement, Advertising, 1930s

Sergeant Sunshine



Scott French, The Complete Guide to the Street Drug Game (1976):

One of the heroes of the Hashbury days was Sergeant Sunshine, a San Francisco cop who became upset at a system where you could easily buy a gun but get arrested for smoking a harmless vegetable. On April 14, 1968, Sgt. Richard Bergess demonstrated his feelings by lighting up a joint on the courthouse steps. Hippies threw a carpet of flowers before the cop, who was promptly arrested by agents in the crowd. Needless to say, this was Sgt. Bergess' last day with the San Francisco police.

He served six months in jail, and subsequently became a plumber.

Posted By: Alex - Sun May 22, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Drugs, Smoking and Tobacco, Police and Other Law Enforcement, 1960s

The Ordinances of Lancaster, South Carolina, 1903

We've all seen those features that dig up "Crazy Laws Still on the Books." But how did such ordinances ever first get established? By big and small towns trying to regulate every human behavior they could think of.

Here are a few choice samples from a randomly chosen place!

Source: The Lancaster News (Lancaster, South Carolina) 16 May 1903



No public marble playing



No annoying churchgoers



No hookers



No tramps, cardsharps or fortune tellers



No dirks or slingshots



No outward-opening gates



Must ring bicycle bell



No piles of public poop



No bad oysters



To their credit, the officials imposed lots of rules on the cops as well. These are just a few.



Posted By: Paul - Wed Jan 19, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Government, Police and Other Law Enforcement, Regionalism, 1900s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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