Category:
Business

Amazon’s Hitler Mustache Logo, and other logo design disasters

BBC News reports that Amazon recently changed its shopping-app logo, in response to complaints that it reminded people of Hitler's mustache. The new logo (below right) is supposed to better represent a piece of parcel tape, which was the original intent, rather than a dictator's mustache.



This reminds me of the topic of logo design disasters, which I once write a short blurb about for another site. That site no longer exists, so I figured I might as well post the blurb here (below, in extended).

More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Fri Mar 05, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Design and Designers

Follies of the Madmen #501

Our jockey shorts will have every male emulating a hula girl.

Source.

(Scroll down.)

Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 03, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Advertising, Underwear, 1950s, Gender-bending

Commercial Telegraph Codes

I was randomly browsing old publications online when I ran across this ad. Thinking about the topic of Communication Codes, I found it hard to believe we had never covered it at WU. But apparently not.



In telecommunication, a commercial code is a code once used to save on cablegram costs.[1]...These codes turned complete phrases into single words (commonly of five letters). These were not always genuine words; for example, codes contained "words" such as BYOXO ("Are you trying to weasel out of our deal?"), LIOUY ("Why do you not answer my question?"), BMULD ("You're a skunk!"), or AYYLU ("Not clearly coded, repeat more clearly.").


Here is a page linking to many digitized volumes.



Posted By: Paul - Tue Mar 02, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Technology, Codes, Cryptography, Puzzles, Riddles, Rebuses and Other Language Alterations, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century

Feminine Hygiene Ads 70s, 80s, 90s

Maybe nearly 500 of these ads is a little excessive for one playlist? See what you think! Here's the first, below, and the rest are here.


Posted By: Paul - Sun Feb 21, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Hygiene, Women, Twentieth Century

Follies of the Madmen #500

I suppose I should have come up with something super-special for the 500th installment of this series, but this will have to suffice!



Sure, kill the talking lion and then...style his mane?

Posted By: Paul - Wed Feb 17, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Business, Advertising, Death, Comics, 1950s, Hair and Hairstyling

Follies of the Madmen #499



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Feb 10, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Food, History, Historical Figure, 1940s

American Look

Your head will be spinning with Midcentury Modern designs by the end of this film. A Utopia that never was.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Feb 03, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Design and Designers, Recreation, Interior Decorating, 1950s, Cars, Yesterday’s Tomorrows

Follies of the Madmen #498

This is a fine example of pushing a metaphor to the point of absurd surrealism.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jan 29, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Miniature People in Ads, Television, Surrealism, 1950s

The Frito Twist



NOTE: the text below calls it a 78, but it looks pretty much like a 45 to me.

This 78 rpm record was made by the PAMS (Production, Advertising, Merchandising Service) production company in February 1962 for the Frito-Lay company to promote its Fritos snack food with a dedicated jingle, the “Frito-Twist.” The disc’s white paper label bears the Fritos and PAMS logos on both sides. Side A plays “The Frito Twist,” and Side B contains the instructional “How to Twist.” (In earlier versions of this promotional record, side A featured “Dallas: My Home Town” with “The Frito Twist” on side B.) The music for the “Frito Twist” was written by Euel Box, a Dallas-based composer and arranger best known for his work on the “Benji” movies of the 1970s and 80s, and a music director for the PAMS company. The sound engineer on the recording was Dick McGrew (as noted in the fine print along the edge of the record).The Dallas-based PAMS production company was founded in 1951 by William B. Meeks, Jr., often credited as the creator of the musical station break. In the 1950s-1970s, advertisers looked to music and dedicated jingles to help promote their products. They aimed branded dance fads in particular at teenagers and young adults.


More info here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jan 20, 2021 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Music, Junk Food, 1960s, Dance

The Traveling Candy Store

I must confess that the notion of a vehicle that brings candy directly to you had never occurred to me before. But what a great idea!

Here's the tale of a modern incarnation.



Here's their website, with an itinerary.

And here's the tale of someone who had the idea 100 years ago! (Scroll up.)






Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 19, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Retailing, Motor Vehicles, Travel, Candy, 1920s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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