Category:
Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature

Weird-Ohs

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How could Weird Universe not do a feature on a line of model kits dubbed "Weird-ohs"...?

This blog features a good writeup on them.

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Here's a period ad from BOYS LIFE.

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And the horrifying reality of the finished product. Buy yours now through the link below!




Posted By: Paul - Tue Oct 01, 2013 - Comments (8)
Category: Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Hobbies and DIY, Toys, Air Travel and Airlines, 1960s, Fictional Monsters

Pussy Katnip

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Gaze upon the horrific, accursed thing that is Pussy Katnip, and tremble in fear.

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And what the hell is going on with these "doggy style" pals of hers?

I am unable to learn anything about the genius of "Len Short," her creator. If any WU-vie can help, please do not hesitate.

Original comic here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Sep 26, 2013 - Comments (3)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Dreams and Nightmares, Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Horror, Comics, 1940s

Red-Headed Mutant

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How did an unweaned rugrat manage to grow out three or four feet of bright red hair? Was she born with that mop? If so, Mom must have had one heck of a birthing experience.

Is it a wig? if so, please explain in 1000 words or less.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Sep 17, 2013 - Comments (7)
Category: Babies, Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Comics, 1950s, Hair and Hairstyling

Twinkle, The Star That Came Down From Heaven

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In the mid-1960s, when I was in elementary school, I had a subscription to HUMPTY DUMPTY MAGAZINE. A very weird comic strip therein was titled "Twinkle, The Star That Came Down From Heaven." (Seen above, drawn by Jerry Smath, and courtesy of the Flickr stream of Glen Mullaly.) Even as a kid, I knew it was strange. A living, sentient star who manifested on Earth in a bipolar costume and kept his face-equipped iconic star head? And did he come from the celestial heaven or the Christian Heaven? Far out!

Little did I know until recently that "Twink" had earlier adventures in the 1940s, in the pages of CALLING ALL KIDS, that were even more bizarre in their fashion. Unfortunately, no information remains about the writer and/or artist who was crazed enough to invent Twinkle.

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You can read several issues here.

This issue appears to be Twink's origin story.

I love those giant railroad engineer/welder's gloves he wears in his 1940s incarnation.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Apr 15, 2013 - Comments (4)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack, Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Comics, Children, 1940s, 1960s

Doomed

Doomed: a biological cartoon! from El Señor Studio on Vimeo.



Over one year ago, I posted a one-minute snippet from this great cartoon. Now, here's the whole ten-minute version.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 13, 2013 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Humor, Cartoons

House Buried by Tumbleweeds

Are you where the wind blows? Maybe you shouldn't take down a fence if there are tumbleweeds around.



This report shows trucks blown over, a helicopter turned upside down, and this poor guy's house COVERED in tumbleweeds.

Posted By: gdanea - Wed Feb 27, 2013 - Comments (5)
Category: Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature

Leggy Dolls



Somehow, Barbie doesn't seem so anatomically impossible anymore.

More info here.

More pics here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jan 25, 2013 - Comments (2)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Body Modifications, Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Toys, 1970s

Oyster Growing on a Set of False Teeth

image source: The Strand magazine - 1903



Oysters will grow on almost any surface, including false teeth, if that's what happens to be available. The tooth-growing oyster shown above was found in the Chesapeake Bay in 1898, and sent to the Smithsonian where they were put on display and became quite a popular attraction. But soon a paternity battle erupted around them. The story was told in the Saint Paul Globe (Nov 30, 1902):

Experts of the United States fish commission have made a special study of the conditions under which oysters grow, and, to illustrate the adaptability of the mollusks, they have got together a very curious collection of objects. It comprises oysters growing upon a great variety of things, such as old boots, rubber shoes, beer glasses, and even a lantern. There is a broken bottle inside of which, as well as on the outside, oysters have found a home.

And, oddest of all, there is an upper set of false teeth to which an enterprising oyster is firmly attached.

The history of this last oyster is decidedly interesting. About four years ago it was raked out of the waters of Chesapeake bay by a dredging boat, together with the false teeth to which it was firmly fixed, and teeth and oyster were acquired by a hotel keeper at Cowart, Va., whose wife forwarded them to the Smithsonian Institution at Washington. The matter obtaining some advertisement, a man named Webster, residing in Bedford, Iowa, claimed the teeth, saying that he had lost them from a steamer bound for Norfolk.

The Smithsonian officials were undecided at first as to whether they should surrender the teeth or not, the object being so great a curiosity that they were anxious to hold on to it. But not many days later a Philadelphia woman claimed them, asserting that they were hers, and actually a third party, visiting the institution, demanded them, declaring that he recognized them as having been lost by himself.

Probably, from first to last, a good many persons have lost their false teeth overboard in the Chesapeake, the waters of which are liable to be pretty rough at times. Any way, the government scientists did not care to decide the dispute, and concluded to retain the specimen.

Half a century later, in 1954, yet another guy insisted the teeth were his, but in this case the Smithsonian was able to definitively rule out his claim, pointing out that the guy hadn't even been born yet when the teeth were found.

I'm guessing the Smithsonian probably still has this tooth-growing oyster hidden away somewhere in its archives.

Daytona Beach Morning Journal - Jan 28, 1954

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 26, 2012 - Comments (3)
Category: Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, Museums, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, Natural Wonders

Big Mouth Dentist

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The dental patient depicted was a favorite at dental training college for his easy access.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 21, 2012 - Comments (7)
Category: Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature, 1920s, Face and Facial Expressions

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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