Category:
Injuries

Knocked out by brick tied to cow tail

One of the many hazards of working on a farm, back in the 1930s. Though I'm having a hard time imagining how a cow could actually lift a brick with its tail and then swing it with enough force to knock someone out.

The Daily Free Press (Carbondale, Illinois) - Jan 21, 1931



BRICK TIED TO COW'S TAIL KNOCKS MILKER UNCONSCIOUS
TOLEDO, Ore., Jan 18 — Jack Horsfall, Toledo high school student, decided to stop his cow's practice of switching her tail while he milked. He tied a brick to her tail. The cow switched her tail anyway, and the brick struck Horsfall behind the ear. He fell unconscious. When he had recovered he untied the brick.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Oct 10, 2015 - Comments (5)
Category: Animals, Injuries, 1930s

Kiss Of Death

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Next up for Darwin Award near miss- guy who tried to kiss a cottonmouth snake on the lips. Yeah, he's from Florida.

Posted By: patty - Wed Apr 22, 2015 - Comments (6)
Category: Animals, Injuries, Really Bad Ideas, Screwups, Pain, Self-inflicted and Otherwise

Ancient Remedy

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Scientists recreated a thousand year old medicinal remedy to study its efficacy and got a big surprise. The mixture, which includes cow bile, garlic, leeks and wine, kills the antibiotic resistant staph infection MRSA.

Posted By: patty - Mon Mar 30, 2015 - Comments (8)
Category: Culture and Civilization, Injuries, Disease

Natural Body Brace

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Unnatural is more like it!

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Dec 07, 2014 - Comments (4)
Category: Body, Injuries, Inventions, 1920s

Mipples (Male Nipples)

Who knew these useless appendages cause such concern.



Continue at your own risk....

More in extended >>

Posted By: Expat47 - Wed Aug 27, 2014 - Comments (5)
Category: Body, Injuries, Underwear

Miss Curity Coloring Book

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Click on each page to expand.

1) Yes, that's a fishhook in the lad's finger. How it was extracted before application of bandaid is not known.

2) Do NOT invite Miss Curity to your party--she's a jinx!

3) Why are they peeing into the lemonade?

Please color within the lines!

Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 27, 2013 - Comments (9)
Category: Art, Comics, Injuries, Advertising, 1950s

Johnson Smith Catalog Item #26

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It is generally understood that the necktie is a symbol of male virility. Thus, when the Marx Brothers or the Three Stooges cut someone's tie off while the fellow is wearing it, it is a symbol of emasculation, and we laugh.

So a necktie that instantly sproings erect on command is surely the best alpha-dog symbol of all! This is why Dilbert rules!

Just don't poke out anybody's eye with that thing!

Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 15, 2012 - Comments (9)
Category: Fashion, Injuries, Johnson Smith Catalog, Sexuality, Chindogu, Pranks

Johnson Smith Catalog Item #15

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[Click to enlarge]

What's good for pigs is good for people!

From the 1950 catalog.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Dec 12, 2011 - Comments (3)
Category: Agriculture, Animals, Injuries, Johnson Smith Catalog, 1950s, Pranks

Weird Science – Watch and Learn


Outside it is not much to look at, little more than a discoloured rock dredged up from the sea floor. But an x-ray scan of the object, actually a pocket watch recovered from a 17th century shipwreck, has revealed that the internal mechanism has been perfectly preserved. The computer aided tomography system used was sensitive enough to pick out the tiniest details, included the engraved name of the master watchmaker, one Niccholas Higginson of Westminster, London (Gizmodo).

As if more proof were needed that they don’t build them like they used to, a UK group has started collecting donations to build the first fully working version of Babbage’s “Analytical Engine”. The original design, dating from 1837, was never completed, possibly due to a combination of the strict engineering tolerances needed and Babbage’s notoriously prickly temperament. If the final machine works as advertised, it will be very strong confirmation of the claim that Babbage designed the first general purpose, programmable computer (BBC News).

Meanwhile, in Slovenia, Borut Povse and his team are busy teaching a modern descendant of Babbage’s design to hit people. Somehow Povse has convinced six volunteers to let an industrial robot hit them on the arm with various sharp or blunt implements in an effort to determine how much pain each blow causes. Obviously this has a beneficial use in that robots can be programmed not to exceed certain levels of force near a human obstacle, but will also be of immense interest to the machines during any future robot uprising (New Scientist).

Another robot out to supplant humans is HRP-4, a gynoid (female android), that has learnt to sing by copying the inflection and expressions of a human performer, right down to the breathing. The hope is to make robots behave in a more convincingly natural way, and so overcome the so called ‘uncanny valley’. From the video, it looks like they’ve still got a way to go (Daily Mail).



More in extended >>

Posted By: Dumbfounded - Fri Oct 22, 2010 - Comments (5)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Charities and Philanthropy, Futurism, History, Archaeology, Injuries, NGOs, Robots, Science, Technology

Follies of the Mad Men #83

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jan 20, 2010 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Horror, Injuries, War, Weapons

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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