Category:
Weddings

Dog-Collar Engagement Rings

An unusual fad, as reported by the San Francisco Examiner, June 19, 1927:

Only the other day there came from Denver the startling news that the young women of this western city were wearing dog collars for engagement rings in lieu of the conventional band of gold, silver or diamond-set platinum. To further emphasize the departure from tradition, the girls wore this romantic token around their legs, as shown in the photograph of Miss Fay Rowe, of Denver, on this page. Thus the engagement ring-dog-collar became a garter as well as a symbol of betrothal, combining utility with romance...

The custom was started by a young woman in one of the college sororities and it spread rapidly. It was generally believed to be something entirely new in the way of betrothal tokens, but had the young woman been a careful student in her history class she would have known that the fad she started was an old one long before the Christian era was born. Jeweled anklets have been discovered in the cinerary urns of the ancient Greeks, with inscriptions which indicate they were tokens of engagement. Bracelets were also common in all ages as tokens of betrothal...

The principal objection to the dog-collar engagement token around the leg seems to be, "What's the use of wearing an engagement ring without anybody seeing it?" To which the answer is, "Nowadays a ring worn about the leg can easily be seen with the skirts of women growing shorter and shorter."

I can think of a few more objections a bride-to-be might have, other than that the dog collar wouldn't be visible.

Posted By: Alex - Tue Nov 26, 2019 - Comments (6)
Category: 1920s, Weddings, Love & Romance

Jackson Barnett, “The World’s Richest Indian”



From Wikipedia:
With the discovery of oil on Barnett's lands in 1912, a series of court actions by interested parties litigated the control of Barnett's trust. Barnett was declared incompetent and denied access to his affairs simply because he only spoke the Muscogee Creek language and not English. Barnett was permitted a modest income and was installed in a house near Henryetta. In 1919 the courts allowed the diversion of money from Barnett's trust to the construction of the "Jackson Barnett Hospital" in Henryetta. In 1920 Barnett, then in his seventies, married Anna Laura Lowe (1881-1952), a fortune hunter whom he had met only once before. The couple had to marry in Kansas after a marriage license was denied in Oklahoma. Barnett's guardians were unable to annul the marriage and the hospital plans were never pursued. Instead, the trust was divided between Anna Barnett and Bacone Indian College.[3]

The Barnetts moved to Los Angeles and bought a mansion on Wilshire Boulevard, where Jackson passed his time directing traffic at a nearby intersection. Legal actions continued from 1923 to 1929, which provoked congressional hearings on the role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in establishing and administering the Barnett trust and others like it. The hearings led to criticism of BIA administrator Charles H. Burke's actions, and during the 1930s, to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. In 1927 Barnett v. Equitable again proclaimed Jackson Barnett incompetent in federal court. In March 1934 another federal ruling annulled the Barnetts' marriage and Anna Barnett's rights to Jackson's trust on the grounds that Jackson had been "kidnapped" by a woman of suspect moral character, but allowed Anna to act as Jackson's caretaker. Jackson Barnett died on 29 May 1934 of natural causes: allegations that Anna had poisoned him were found to be false.[3][4]

Anna was finally evicted from the Wilshire Boulevard residence after four years, even though she had gained significant support from Los Angeles society,[5] including Los Angeles District Attorney Burton Fitts and California Governor Frank Merriam. Anna had to be tear-gassed after she threw a hatchet during the eviction,[5] and lived the remainder of her life with a daughter while unsuccessfully attempting to regain a share of the Barnett estate, which amounted to $3.5 million in 1934 ($55.4 million estimated value in 2012 dollars).




Source.



Lots more info here.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Nov 10, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Crime, Unauthorized Dwellings, Forgotten Figures and Where Are They Now?, Frauds, Cons and Scams, Government, Hospitals, Twentieth Century, Native Americans, Weddings

Janet Downes, Sologamy Pioneer

We’ve posted before about sologamy, which is the term for marrying yourself. Back in 2017, we described it as a growing trend. But apparently the woman who gets credit for pioneering this practice was Janet Downes of Nebraska who, on June 27, 1998, married herself. She recited her vows in front of a mirror.



Downes died in 2007. But in a post over at realdivasride.com, she recollected about her self-wedding and explained how it came to be:

In 1998 I was about to celebrate my 40th birthday. I had a wedding theme planned for my party and everyone thought I was nuts. Maybe I am a little but I got tired of seeing everything in the stores that was related to ‘40’ being in black. So I decided to poke a little fun at society because I didn’t feel old. That coupled with the fact that after 19 years of adulthood, I was finally at a place in my life where I was happy with almost every aspect of my life. I’d been married & divorce twice at that time, yet I no longer needed a man to ‘fulfill’ me. I had 3 beautiful children (Nicole, Jasmine & Eugene Jr.) and for the first time, was satisfied with my body. You know what I mean ladies? We always seem to feel that our breasts are too small or too big. Always complaining that something is wrong with our hips, butt or legs. We can always find something wrong with ourselves when we look in the mirror. One day I woke up & decided, I was happy with who I was, just the way I was. So that led me to, marrying myself. I didn’t know it at the time but that little stunt got me international fame. It seems that I was the first woman to think of it and actually carry it out. It was a beautiful wedding and I am happy with myself, even now.

Calgary Herald - June 18, 1998

Posted By: Alex - Wed May 08, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Marriage, 1990s, Weddings

Wedding with lie detector

A lie detector used at the 1932 wedding of Harriet Berger and Vaclav Rund determined that their love was true.

Vaclav and Harriet were still together in 1940, according to the census. So, score one for the lie detector. I haven't been able to trace their marriage any later than that. Though a V.R. Rund of the correct location and birth year died in 1989.

(Some media sources listed the bridegroom's name as Vaclaw Hund, but I think 'Rund' was his correct name, given the census data.)

Albuquerque Journal - June 14, 1932



Sioux Falls Argus-Leader - June 1, 1932

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jun 04, 2018 - Comments (0)
Category: Psychology, 1930s, Weddings

Ruff wedding

In 1994, guests at a wedding reception were expecting to see footage of the ceremony replayed. Instead they were treated to scenes of Derek Jeffrey in flagrante delicto with a dog, Ronnie. Because, oops, Jeffrey had lent his camcorder to a friend to video the wedding, but he accidentally left the wrong tape in the camcorder, and it didn't get fully taped over. He received a six-month suspended jail sentence for bestiality.

The whole scene sounds so outlandish that I suspected it might have been an urban legend reported as news. But Snopes confirms that the story is true.

Sydney Morning Herald - Apr 21, 1994

Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 16, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Dogs, 1990s, Weddings

Lion Cage Weddings

The recurring theme of people who get married in a lions' cage.

1930s — no exact date or location specified



Lion-tamer George J. Keller weds Ginny Lowry in Cleveland, Ohio
Minneapolis Star Tribune - Mar 10, 1957



Lion-tamer Jimmy Bells weds trapeze artist Experanza Esqueda Gonzales
Torreon, Mexico - July 18, 1967



Lion-tamer Julius Von Uhl and his assistant of six years Linda Pritchard wed in Warren, Michigan
Fremont News-Messenger - Aug 15 1987

Posted By: Alex - Sun Sep 03, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Animals, Weddings, Love & Romance

Sologamy

Sologamy = marrying yourself. Apparently it's a growing trend. A way to say yes to yourself. And there are various companies (such as here and here) that will help you do it.

I don't buy into all the talk about marrying yourself as a form of self-affirmation, but I think there is some logic to the idea that if you know you're never going to get married to someone else — that's your life choice — that you should be able to get some gifts to celebrate your non-marriage. After all, those gifts can really help furnish an apartment or house.

More info: khou.com

Below: Charlotte's Sologamy Wedding

Posted By: Alex - Wed May 24, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Weddings

Mystery Illustration 40



Who was the celebrity groom who wore this amazing outfit to his wedding?

The answer is here.

And after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Tue Feb 28, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: 1970s, Weddings

Space Age Bridal Creation

March 1962: Arlette Dobson and John Richard took a stroll along London's Park Lane while modeling a "space age bridal outfit."

I'd like to see a wedding with the bride and groom wearing these outfits, and the bridesmaids in Gianangelli's lunar bathing suits.



Rochester Democrat and Chronicle - Mar 10, 1962

Posted By: Alex - Tue Dec 06, 2016 - Comments (3)
Category: Fashion, 1960s, Weddings

Caveman Wedding



Original photo here.

Also, more weird weddings at the link.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 27, 2016 - Comments (0)
Category: Archaeology, 1930s, Weddings

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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