Category:
Wives

Follies of the Madmen #481



Isn't it the offending husband who is usually the spouse assigned to sleep in the tub?

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jun 26, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Domestic, Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Husbands, Wives, 1960s

Safety Kisses

Throughout the 20th century, it seemed to be widely assumed that the mood of the husband was determined by the behavior of his wife at home. So, concluded the District of Columbia's traffic safety office in 1963, if a man was in a 'disgruntled disposition' and consequently got into a traffic accident, it must have been the fault of his wife who didn't cheer him up adequately when he left home with a goodbye kiss "as though she meant it."

See also: Whose fault is it when your husband is cross at breakfast?

Minneapolis Star - Nov 12, 1963

Posted By: Alex - Wed May 20, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Highways, Roads, Streets and Traffic, Gender, Husbands, Wives, 1960s

Matrimonial Delusions




Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Apr 27, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Bad Habits, Neuroses and Psychoses, Money, Husbands, Wives, 1900s

She was boring her husband to death

This ad for Vivarin stimulant tablets ran in newspapers and magazines in 1971. It prompted a complaint from the FTC.

San Bernardino Sun - Mar 28, 1971



Ivan Preston provides more details in The Great American Blow-Up: Puffery in Advertising and Selling:

ads for a product called Vivarin told women their husbands would be more attracted to them if they used it, apparently implying some sort of sexually based arousal which would renew the lagging instincts of tired old married folks. To quote the ad directly:

"One day it dawned on me that I was boring my husband to death. It was hard for me to admit it—but it was true…. Often by the time he came home at night I was feeling dull, tired and drowsy, and so Jim would look at television and, for the most part, act like I wasn’t even there. And I wasn’t. I decided that I had to do something. I had seen an advertisement for a tablet called Vivarin. It said that Vivarin was a non-habit forming stimulant tablet that would give me a quick lift. Last week… I took a Vivarin tablet… just about an hour before Jim came home, and I found time to pretty up a little, too. It worked. All of a sudden Jim was coming home to a more exciting woman, me… The other day—it wasn’t even my birthday—Jim sent me flowers with a note. The note began: ‘To my new wife…'"

All very nice, but but the contribution of Vivarin was to provide merely the amount of caffeine found in two cups of coffee. No miracle aphrodisiac, just good old caffeine at a premium price!
The major allegation of the FTC's complaint about Vivarin concerned this social-psychological misrepresentation... But the Vivarin ads were also alleged to be deceptive because they did not disclose caffeine to be the critical ingredient.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Apr 20, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Drugs, Advertising, Wives, 1970s

Whose fault is it when your husband is cross at breakfast?

Answer (according to 1920's ad men): It's the wife's fault for serving him coffee or tea.

Strange, because I'm pretty crabby in the morning if I don't have coffee.

The Helena Star - Oct 6, 1921

Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 28, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Advertising, Husbands, Wives, 1920s

The Radium Wedding

Much more exciting than Platinum.

Article source.



Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 03, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Anniversary, Husbands, Wives, 1910s

Raising a Perfect Wife From Scratch



Sabrina Sidney, was a British foundling girl taken in when she was 12 by author Thomas Day, who wanted to mould her into his perfect wife. Day had been struggling to find a wife who would share his ideology and had been rejected by several women. Inspired by Jean-Jacques Rousseau's book Emile, or On Education, he decided to educate two girls without any frivolities, using his own concepts.

In 1769, Day and his barrister friend, John Bicknell, chose Sidney and another girl, Lucretia, from orphanages, and falsely declared they would be indentured to Day's friend Richard Lovell Edgeworth. Day took the girls to France to begin Rousseau's methods of education in isolation. After a short time, he returned to Lichfield with only Sidney, having deemed Lucretia inappropriate for his experiment. He used unusual, eccentric, and sometimes cruel, techniques to try to increase her fortitude, such as firing blanks at her skirts, dripping hot wax on her arms, and having her wade into a lake fully dressed to test her resilience to cold water.


The full story here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue May 07, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Eccentrics, Education, Husbands, Wives, Eighteenth Century, Nineteenth Century, Love & Romance

Follies of the Madmen #375



"You like your booze so much, why don't you marry her?"

"Thanks! I think I will!"

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 21, 2018 - Comments (6)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Wives, 1940s, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #307



Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 15, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Domestic, Wives, 1930s

Hindu Ceremonial Animal Marriages



1932 report here.

The practice of having a human marry an animal for various mystical reasons has been a part of Hindu religion for who-knows-how-long, and continues to the present.




Full article here.

And then of course there is marrying a tree as well.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 10, 2016 - Comments (5)
Category: Animals, Anthropomorphism, Religion, Husbands, Wives, 1930s, Asia

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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