Category:
Underwear

Wong Tai Tung’s Metal Brassiere

In 1968, the British Patent Office granted Wong Tai Tung of Hong Kong Patent No. 1,105,147 for "Improvements in or relating to Brassiere Garments". From his patent:

The human civilization is making progress day by day. The present thinking is in favour of increasing exposure of the parts of their body, especially the female bosom which is attractive to everybody with its charm.

It is the most important point for women to have decorated brassiere garments to enhance the beauty of the bosom.

In order to meet with their requirement, I have invented a decorative metal brassiere garment. It makes the bosom appear bigger because of the twingle and sparking light of ornaments of gems and pearls on the garment.



Posted By: Alex - Mon Feb 14, 2022 - Comments (6)
Category: Fashion, Underwear, Patents, 1960s

The Damsel In Undress Campaign

A series of lingerie ads from the 1960s.

Many more pics here, also from the same company's other campaigns.





Posted By: Paul - Fri Oct 22, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Movies, Advertising, Underwear, 1960s

Ralph Woltstem’s Breast Supporters

Back in the 1920s, Ralph Woltstem reimagined the brassiere. He did away with the straps around the shoulders and instead used columns to provide support from below. These columns, in turn, incorporated shock absorbers. He was granted two patents for this invention. The device in both patents looks pretty much identical to me. The images are from Patent No. 1762676, and the explanatory text below is from Patent No. 1741898:

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in breast supporters for women and aims to provide simple, inexpensive and efficient means whereby large and flabby breasts of women, especially of the buxom type, may be so supported as to assume a firm and solid condition. Furthermore, the use of my present device will prevent the flapping of the breasts while walking, which always is an undesired feature in women afflicted with breasts of unusual proportions.




Posted By: Alex - Sun Sep 19, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Patents, Underwear, 1920s

The Perma-Lift Line of Undergarments

I'm surprised no one has revived this trade name.









Posted By: Paul - Tue Sep 14, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Advertising, Underwear, Twentieth Century

1965 Vogue Lingerie Feature

To see larger images of every page, go to link.

CAUTION: NSFW pop-ups might intervene!



Posted By: Paul - Fri Aug 13, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Anthropomorphism, Fashion, Underwear, Surrealism, 1960s

Evian Water Bra

Brand-Extension Failure: Evian released a "water bra" in 2005, apparently because they thought their association with bottled water could persuade women to buy water-filled bras. The idea was that water-filled bras would be cooling. As far as I can tell, the product was discontinued soon after being introduced.

More info: impactlab.com

Posted By: Alex - Thu May 13, 2021 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Underwear

Follies of the Madmen #505

All scholars of oddball advertising are familiar with the Maidenform Bra campaign that used the tagline "I dreamed I...in my Maidenform Bra." But I don't believe I've ever seen the campaign translated from print to 3-D.



"This is an original vintage photograph from the 1950s. It shows a surreal Maidenform Bra window display at Parsons Souders store in downtown Clarksburg, West Virginia."

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Apr 12, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Underwear, 1950s

Avoid Undie Odor

Throughout the 1930s and 40s, the marketing team for Lux soap repeatedly warned consumers that if they didn't wash their clothes everyday, they risked having "undie odor". Some details from Suellen Hoy in her book Chasing Dirt: The American Pursuit of Cleanliness:

Lever Brothers, the makers of Rinso, Lifebuoy, and Lux soap, revised its advertising copy over the years to reflect the changing cultural meanings of soap itself... In 1916, Lux was "a wonderful new product" for "laundering fine fabrics:; by the mid-twenties it could also preserve "soft, youthful, lovely feminine hands" and, by the early thirties, prevent "undie odor" as well—"She never omits her Daily Bath, yet she wears underthings a SECOND DAY."

Francis Countway, the president of Lever Brothers and the individual most responsible for the "discovery" of body odors and the "stop smelling" ad pitch, was inspired by Listerine's successful advertising campaign against the previously unknown halitosis. Countway and his associates admitted, while Lever Brothers' business boomed, that they cared little "about the opinions of softies who think that the Body and Undie Odor copy is disgusting." They were simply doing their job, "bringing cleanliness into a dirty world."

Lux soap was also responsible for the "undies are gossips" campaign.

Wilmington Evening Journal - Feb 9, 1932



Kansas City Star - Apr 24, 1940

Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 08, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Hygiene, Advertising, Underwear, 1930s, Smells and Odors

Lingerie

Posted By: Paul - Sat Mar 27, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Body, Business, Movies, Underwear, 1920s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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