Category:
Food

Dormice as a delicacy

Recently in the news:

A hoard of 235 frozen dormice have been discovered during a police drugs raid in southern Italy.

The small rodents are believed to be a mafia delicacy served at important banquets. They were found when officers searched outbuildings of a cannabis farm in Reggio Calabria on Saturday.

Apparently dormice have been considered a delicacy since Roman times. Seconds Food History offers some info:

Special outdoor pens were used to raise edible dormice, where they’d be fed acorns, chestnuts and walnuts. When it was time to fatten the rodents, they’d be moved to terracotta containers called dolia. These jar-like vessels were specially designed to replicate the hollow of a tree, with limited space to discourage movement and encourage the storing of fat.

Back in the 1970s, Richard Hunt of High Lane, England had a business selling frozen dormice, "electrocuted and carefully skinned," for $51 each. That would be over $200 each, in today's dollars.

Dormice subsequently became protected under EU law, which must have ended Hunt's business. But has Brexit made it legal again to sell dormouse meat in the UK? I don't know.

Fort Worth Star Telegram - Aug 4, 1977


Posted By: Alex - Sun Nov 07, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Food

Kentucky Roast Beef

Here's a neat article about this failed venture by Colonel Sanders.

You won't find the image below at that page.


Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 21, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Food, Success & Failure, 1960s

Richard Nixon, Cottage Cheese, and Ketchup

Richard Nixon's favorite snack was reportedly cottage cheese topped with ketchup.

A 1960 article in the LA Times treated this as noncontroversial personal information about the then-presidential candidate, noting that he had acquired a taste for this unusual delicacy from his Quaker grandmother.

Los Angeles Times - Mar 14, 1960



However, by the 1970s Nixon's team was downplaying his fondness for this snack. Helen Smith, the first lady's press secretary, dismissed it as overblown rumor.

Casper Star Tribune - June 5, 1973



Similarly, White House chef Henry Haller, in his book The White House Family Cookbook, denied he had ever seen Nixon eat such a concoction: "If the President ever doused his cottage cheese with catsup, I never saw him, and doubt he ever did."

I suspect the truth is that Nixon enjoyed this snack when he was younger, but didn't continue eating it when he was President. Regardless, the combination of cottage cheese and ketchup was definitely associated with Nixon in the public mind, and it inspired one odd work of art.

In 1973, on the eve of Nixon's second inauguration, the sculptor Carl Andre dumped 500 pounds of cottage cheese on the floor of the Max Protetch gallery in Washington, DC. He then topped this with 10 gallons of ketchup. He called the work 'American Decay'. However, it smelled so bad that it all had to be removed the next day.

More info: Interview Magazine

'American Decay'. Image source: bonhams

Posted By: Alex - Mon Oct 18, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Food, Politics, 1970s

Gastro Obscura

A new book from the ATLAS OBSCURA folks about weird foods. A perfect Xmas present for any WU-vie!

I understand Jeppson's Malört is discussed therein.



Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 14, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Regionalism, World, Nausea, Revulsion and Disgust

Long Eggs

Long eggs are either: a) eggs laid by specially bred long chickens; or b) a highly engineered food product created in the 1970s to satisfy the food service industry's desire to have egg slices with a consistent ratio of white and yolk.

You can choose what you want to believe.

source: shemazing.net



The video below shows how long eggs might be engineered. It's in German, but even if you don't speak that it's easy to understand what's going on.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Oct 04, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Food

Killer Tomatoes

My partner grafts tomatoes for our garden. Must caution against this!

Source: The Knoxville News-Sentinel (Knoxville, Tennessee) 31 Oct 1963, Thu Page 14



Posted By: Paul - Thu Sep 16, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Family, Food, Psychedelic, 1960s, Goofs and Screw-ups

Follies of the Madmen #515

Either an eensy-teensy chopping block and cleaver, or a very large can of tuna.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Sep 12, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Enlargements, Miniatures, and Other Matters of Scale, Food, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1960s

Sour Cream Cookbook Ad

We're sweet on sour cream.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Sep 10, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Advertising, 1950s

What happens when a fly lands on your food

1970 ad for the UK Health Education Council. The text is credited to Charles Saatchi, who was then a young advertising executive (and is now a wealthy art collector).

More info: The Guardian

Posted By: Alex - Tue Aug 31, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Insects and Spiders, Advertising, 1970s

Fruit Cake Queen of 1968

No further info available!

Posted By: Paul - Tue Aug 17, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Food, 1960s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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