Category:
Comics

Arm Fall Off Boy

One of the lesser-known superheroes in the DC Comics universe. Though to DC fans he's apparently fairly well-known, or notorious, as arguably the weirdest DC superhero. His superpower: being able to remove either of his arms (or his legs) and use them as weapons.

More info: wikipedia



Posted By: Alex - Sun Sep 29, 2019 - Comments (6)
Category: Comics, Superheroes

Cecil Jensen’s ELMO

I'm about thirty pages into this book, and can't recommend it highly enough. Pure hilarious surrealism.



Read a long article about the strip here.





Posted By: Paul - Wed Sep 11, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Comics, Outsider Art, Surrealism, 1940s

Follies of the Madmen #437



1) A bicycle tire confusingly has the same name as a razor blade company.

2) The mascot for the tire is a hyper-dimensional polar bear. These creatures apparently represent all that is desirable in a tire.

3) Even with its magic powers, the hyper-dimensional polar bear does not act to save the victim directly, but makes the human boy do all the work.

4) Moral: buy our tires to avoid snake bites?

Source (page 20).

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jul 28, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Accidents, Anthropomorphism, Bicycles and Other Human-powered Vehicles, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Comics

The Cremain Comic Book

We've posted before about how, when Frisbee-inventor Ed Headrick died in 2002, his ashes were incorporated into special-edition frisbees that were sold for $200.

Along similar lines, when comic book writer Mark Gruenwald died in 1996, some of his cremains were mixed into the printer's ink for the trade paperback compilation of his Squadron Supreme graphic novel. As explained by his widow:

The whole ash thing was a complete fluke when we wrote up our wills in 1992; he put in a direction to have me cremate him and put his ashes into a comic book. Yeah, yeah…that will never happen, I thought to myself. Little did I know, four years later I’d be doing just that. And Marvel cooperated and we did it! I drove up to the plant in Connecticut and stirred the ashes into the ink that was used for Squadron Supreme, his best-selling graphic novel. That all happened between 1996-97.

If you're interested, You can buy a copy of the cremain edition on eBay for $199.99.

I wonder how many other mass-produced items have contained someone's cremains?

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jul 21, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Death, Comics, 1990s

How to housebreak your dog

Ernie Bushmiller is best known as the creator of the Nancy comic strip, which was known for being very wholesome. But it turns out that his most popular and frequently reproduced cartoon, by a wide margin, was a slightly off-color one that he drew in 1961, and which was included that year in the Duch Treat Club Yearbook. He titled it "How to housebreak your dog."

The Comics Journal details the many lives of this cartoon, noting:

For whatever reasons "How To Housebreak Your Dog" has screamed “reproduce me” again and again to America for nearly six decades and willing entrepreneurs have readily responded to this call of nature. Bushmiller’s humble dog-pee joke flows gloriously onward, replicating like mutant bacteria through the dark alleys of our pop culture. And like a grinning dog before a mighty oak, each subsequent publisher seems strangely compelled to leave his unique mark on this enduring work.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jul 06, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Comics, Dogs, 1960s

Fearless Fosdick TV Show



A show derived from a parody within a newspaper comic strip--and using puppets.

That's meta!

Wikipedia entry.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Apr 14, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Cops, Puppets and Automatons, Television, Comics, 1950s, Parody

Follies of the Madmen #409



The man and the women are plainly inhabitants of totally different cartoon universes, the inverse relationship of Roger and Jessica Rabbit. This rather destroys the impact of the whole ad.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 29, 2019 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Tobacco and Smoking, Comics, 1930s

Mary Worth, the Full Version



This is an experiment where the mise en scene of the comic strip is done directly to film. MADE BY: stephanie barber, peter barrickman, sara boland, tate bunker, theresa columbus, yasuhuhiro ikeguchi, anna johnson, annie killelea, didier leplae, xav leplae, doug schall, naomi wyoming.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jan 04, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Comics, Homages, Pastiches, Tributes and Borrowings, Performance Art, Surrealism

The Church of Batman

Dr. Terwilliger said ‘Batman,’ the once-popular television show, was an instance of subliminal religion. He said Batman is a Messianic cult in a fantasy. “He is invoked. He comes with his miracles. The problems he solves are demonic. He is purely an ambiguous savior but he satisfied a sort of religious need,” the speaker said.


(L) Wilkes-Barre Times Leader - Apr 5, 1968; (R) R: Wilkes-Barre Times Leader - Aug 8, 1966



Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 22, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Religion, Comics

Superman to the Rescue!

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 08, 2018 - Comments (7)
Category: Business, Advertising, Domestic, Food, Comics, 1950s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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