Category:
1910s

Conversation Hose

Sending messages via hosiery.

This was like the 1910's equivalent of social media.

Harrisburg Telegraph - Feb 19, 1916

Posted By: Alex - Sun Feb 18, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Fashion, 1910s

Super-Greater New York



We can still do this. A nice walk to the Statue of Liberty on Landfill Manhattan.

Source of document.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 05, 2018 - Comments (6)
Category: Engineering and Construction, Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Urban Life, 1910s

Kissing Screen

Popular Science Monthly - Feb 1920



Oakland Tribune - May 1, 1910



The Day Book - Feb 19, 1912

Posted By: Alex - Sat Feb 03, 2018 - Comments (4)
Category: Hygiene, 1910s

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 9



"Unique Forms of Continuity in Space," 1913 bronze by Umberto Boccioni

More info on the artist.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Jan 25, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, 1910s, Russia

On the Good Ship Apple Pie

"Display of Steamship "Gold" made of whole and dried apples. The first Sebastopol Apple Show was held in a tent across from the Petaluma & Santa Rosa Depot in August, 1910 and promoted local fruit in various creative ways."



Posted By: Paul - Sun Oct 15, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Fairs, Amusement Parks, and Resorts, Food, 1910s

Mystery Illustration 59



The purpose?

Answer here.

And after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Sun Oct 08, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Technology, 1910s

Drip Fire Rifle

Invented by Lance Corporal William Charles Scurry during WWI, while fighting in Gallipoli. The Drip Fire Rifle was a way to jerry-rig a rifle using readily available materials so that it would randomly fire on its own. The Australian forces set up a whole bunch of these Drip Fire Rifles, and in this way were able to fool the Turkish forces into thinking they were actively manning the front lines, when in fact they were all sneaking away in boats. From abc.net.au:

His invention involved water dripping from one ration tin into a lower tin attached to a weight, which was tied to a trigger. Depending on the hole in the ration tin, the lower one could take between 20 minutes to an hour to fill. The weight would then pull the rifle trigger. The resultant sporadic fire sounded like any other night, and mirrored the rhythms of the Anzacs that the Turkish forces had grown familiar with.


via Australian War Memorial

Posted By: Alex - Sat Sep 16, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Inventions, War, Weapons, 1910s

George Washington Glick



As you can see from this 1914 article George Washington Glick was practically unknown when his statue was new. Is it any wonder then that, as Wikipedia tells us, "In 2003, Kansas became the first state to replace a statue [in the National Statuary Hall] when it replaced Glick with a bronze of former president Dwight D. Eisenhower. Glick's statue was moved to the Kansas History Center in Topeka."



Posted By: Paul - Tue Aug 08, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Forgotten Figures and Where Are They Now?, Politics, Statues and Monuments, 1910s, Nineteenth Century

Bacon Costume

George J. Nicholls, author of the 1917 book Bacon and Hams, dressed as a slab of bacon.



More info about this rare and curious book at CookingIssues.com and Wikipedia.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jul 29, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Bacon, 1910s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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