Category:
Sports

Ultimate Tazer Ball

Another sport that, like mobile phone throwing, arose in the 21st century, flourished briefly, involved new technology, but then fizzled and disappeared.

How the game was played, according to wikipedia:

Two teams compete to get a large (24-inch diameter) ball into goal at either end of the 200 x 85-foot field. Players on both teams are all armed with stun gun devices. Under the rules of the game players are allowed to use the stun guns on opposing players who are in possession of the ball.

The UTB website is now defunct, but can still be partially viewed via the Wayback Machine.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Apr 21, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Sports

Bear vs Man

New York, 1937.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Apr 19, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Sports, 1930s

Mobile Phone Throwing

It's a sport that got its start in Finland in 2000. From wikipedia: "participants throw mobile phones and are judged on distance or technique. World record holder is Tom Philipp Reinhardt from Germany with a throw of 136,75m."

But the competitions seem to have ended. The last title winners listed on wikipedia are from 2014. I can't find any more recent elsewhere. Perhaps people are reluctant to throw their smart phones?

Posted By: Alex - Tue Apr 16, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Sports, Telephones

Burning Baseball Fields

Although the practice is not advised, apparently it's fairly common for people to try to quickly dry out wet baseball fields by dousing them in gasoline and burning them.

One such case was recently in the news: "Baseball field closed due to 'poor decision' to douse it in gas, set it on fire"



But youtube offers up many more examples.





via reddit

Posted By: Alex - Wed Apr 10, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Sports

Bridge player caught doping

A doping scandal has rocked the world of competitive bridge. The World Bridge Federation announced that top-ranked player Geir Helgemo has been suspended after he tested positive for synthetic testosterone and the female fertility drug clomifene while playing in the World Bridge Series in Orlando, Florida.

Of course, these drugs don't enhance or otherwise affect one's ability to play bridge. But apparently the World Bridge Federation is recognized by the International Olympic Committee, which means the bridge players need to follow the same anti-doping rules as Olympic athletes.

More details: globalnews.ca

Posted By: Alex - Sat Mar 09, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Drugs, Games, Sports

Golf Ball Hits Airplane

Back in in 1969, a golfer accidentally managed to hit a plane with his ball. The ball went through the plexiglass windshield and into the cockpit.

Which raises the question: Do golf balls pose a potential hazard to planes? This is discussed in a thread over at aviation.stackexchange.com, and the consensus seems to be, not really. Even if a golf ball were, somehow, to get into a plane's engine, it's probably small enough that it wouldn't cause damage.

Oakland Tribune - Jan 16, 1969



I was curious about how often golfers hit planes. Apparently, not often. But some googling yielded this video, which purports to show a golfer hitting a 757 with a ball. Though no one in the YouTube comments seems to believe he actually hit the plane.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Mar 06, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Sports, Air Travel and Airlines

Follies of the Madmen #406



Joe Louis lives in your car's engine.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 15, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Sports, Technology, 1930s

86-year-old trapeze artist

Betty Goedhart first tried the trapeze at the age of 78, after a career as an ice skater. So she had an athletic background. Even so, she's got some seriously good genes.

More info: fox news

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jan 14, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Sports, World Records

The rookie rower who failed to cross the Atlantic

Even though he had only been on the ocean once, while taking the Newfoundland ferry, Arthur Russell figured he could row across the Atlantic. He practiced for two years on his rowing machine and then set off from Halifax harbor. Six hours later, he had to signal for help and was rescued.

Edmonton Journal - May 31, 1990

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jan 11, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Boats, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, Sports, 1990s

The Jump-Roping Rabbi

Rabbi Barry Silberg set a world record in 1975 for jumping rope for five hours. According to Guinness, the current record, set in 2009, is 33 hours 20 minutes. That's not even close. So why such a huge difference? Did shoes get better, or something?

Moline Dispatch - June 25, 1975



Green Bay Press Gazette - Mar 31, 1975

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jan 10, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Sports, World Records

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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