Category:
Teeth

Remove the braces, or else…

I'm sure this must have been the strangest day in Norman Carstens' career as an orthodontist:

The boy had apparently asked other dentists in the area to remove his braces before visiting Carstens' Mack Avenue office on Feb 8, "probably because he lives three or four blocks from my office," Carstens said. "He (came) in to see me and said he wanted them off. I said he wasn't finished with his treatment and I couldn't take them off without a letter from his parents and his regular orthodontist.
"I had him in the chair and he leaned over and pulled the gun out of his pocket and said, 'Would this make you change your mind?' and I said, 'Yes,'" Carstens said.

(click to enlarge)
Central New Jersey Home News - Feb 16, 1985

Posted By: Alex - Thu Sep 10, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: 1980s, Weapons, Teeth

Keep the mouth glands active

"unless we watch out, the mouth glands slow up and decay sets in. The formula to correct this was worked out in Pebeco Tooth Paste."

San Francisco Examiner - Aug 21, 1927

Posted By: Alex - Mon Aug 24, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Hygiene, Advertising, 1920s, Teeth

Spongo

"GET ACTUAL THRILL SENSATION USING SPONGO"

image source: Smithsonian



Wilkes-Barre Times Leader - May 25, 1938

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jun 01, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Hygiene, 1930s, Teeth

Reverse Smoking

In some parts of the world, people smoke cigarettes by holding the lit end inside their mouth. Apparently this doesn't burn them. In fact, reverse smokers claim that they enjoy the sensation of warmth it creates inside their mouth.

Journal of the American Dental Association - Mar 1976



Because reverse smoking has long been suspected of causing various dental problems, the most complete analyses of this habit are found in dental journals. I thought this discussion of it from a March 1976 article in the Journal of the American Dental Association contained some particularly interesting bits of info:

The cigarette-smoking habits of people in some parts of the world include a variation called reverse smoking, which is accomplished by holding the lighted end of a cigarette or cigar inside the oral cavity. Air is drawn to the burning zone through the unlighted end of a cigarette, and smoke is expelled back through the cigarette or out through the mouth. The smoke is not usually inhaled; however, the ashes are swallowed. Smoke and tar products are allowed to condense on the surfaces of the teeth, palate, and adjacent mucosa. Tobacco tar and smoke that come into contact with the highly vascular moist mucosa contribute to the pleasurable sensation.

Reverse smoking has been reported to occur in the lower economic groups in areas of India, the Caribbean, Sardinia, South America, Korea, and the Philippine Islands. In the Philippine Islands, reverse smoking is referred to as “ bakwe” and is practiced almost exclusively by married women. It is a symbolic indication of the achievement of marital status and represents the responsibility that is peculiar to a married woman, in contrast to the carefree life-style of an unattached maiden. Many look on an unmarried smoker as a woman of easy virtue.

It is noteworthy that in parts of Korea women begin smoking on their 60th birthday, to represent the beginning of their retired life. This signifies wisdom and experience.

Motherhood and housework are the primary reasons why reverse smoking is practiced only by women. It enables the mother to feed and tend to her child without the risk of the infant touching the lighted end of the cigarette. It also eliminates the possibility of ashes dropping on children, eating utensils, clothing that is being washed, and food that is being prepared.

Reverse smokers give several other reasons for indulging in this peculiar habit: it is more pleasurable than conventional smoking; it gives one the feeling of warmth during the rainy season (This may explain why reverse smoking is practiced primarily in equatorial climates, which usually have a long rainy season.); there is no desire to inhale; and the cigarette or cigar lasts longer.

A study by Quigley and others reported that the average time for conventional smoking of a cigarette is four minutes and six seconds, whereas the average time for reverse smoking is seven minutes 42 seconds. Native reverse smokers may retain a single cigarette for as long as 18 minutes.

Journal of the American Dental Association - Apr 1966



Heavy tar buildup inside the mouth of a reverse smoker.
Journal of the American Dental Association - Oct 1964

Posted By: Alex - Tue Sep 24, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Smoking and Tobacco, Teeth

Jaw Relation Simulator

“to help police investigations related to people who have been bitten by other people and who retain marks in their flesh from the experience.”



Chicago Tribune - Apr 1, 1990

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jun 05, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Police and Other Law Enforcement, Teeth

Murphy the Molar

A talking tooth from Canada.

More info: Lorne Park Dental



Posted By: Alex - Fri Mar 08, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Video, 1970s, Teeth

Push-Button Toothpaste

Toothpaste in a shaving-cream can.

Colorado Springs Gazette - Nov 24, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jun 30, 2018 - Comments (4)
Category: Products, 1970s, Teeth

Dentists smell fear

Recent research reveals that dentists can not only smell fear, but that when they do their job performance significantly declines. From New Scientist:

The researchers asked 24 student volunteers to each donate a T-shirt they had worn during a stressful exam, and another worn at a calm lecture. The team doused the T-shirts with a chemical that masks body odour, so that no one could consciously smell it. A separate group of 24 dental students said they couldn’t detect any difference between the two sets of shirts.
Next, examiners graded the dental students as they carried out treatments on mannequins dressed in the donated T-shirts. The students scored significantly worse when the mannequins were wearing T-shirts from stressful contexts. Mistakes included being more likely to damage teeth next to the ones they were working on.

So, if your fear causes your dentist to start making more mistakes, I assume that will only increase your fear, causing your dentist to make even more mistakes, leading to a downward-spiraling cycle of terror.

The academic study is here.

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 05, 2018 - Comments (4)
Category: Experiments, Psychology, Teeth

Dentologia:  A Poem on the Diseases of the Teeth



Full text here.

Thanks to Richard Bleiler.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Apr 13, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Hygiene, Poetry, Nineteenth Century, Diseases, Teeth

Follies of the Madmen #348



Sadistic dentist, with an eye toward cultivating future patients, gives out candy.


Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 23, 2018 - Comments (4)
Category: Medicine, Advertising, 1920s, Teeth

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