Category:
Oceans and Maritime Pursuits

Rafael Trujillo, Partying Dictator

Not that Rafael Trujillo's murderous reign is redeemed by his party animal ways, but it's always nice to see someone who doesn't let his work stand in the way of having fun.

First he arrives at LA and smashes another boat, then avoids fees by declaring himself a ship of war.

Source: The Los Angeles Times 21 Jun 1958, Sat Page 2

Then he insults our national holiday and causes an uproar on Catalina Island.

Source: The Los Angeles Times 05 Jul 1958, Sat Page 1


Of course, none of this jovial playboy behavior prevented him from getting assassinated three years later.












Posted By: Paul - Mon Mar 22, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Dictators, Tyrants and Other Harsh Rulers, Dinners, Banquets, Parties, Tributes, Roasts and Other Celebrations, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1950s, Outrageous Excess, North America

“Wonder” by Ebony Buckle



London-based singer/songwriter Ebony Buckle is back with her latest single “Wonder”. The track is inspired by the world’s loneliest whale. “52” was first discovered in the 80s, singing at a frequency of 52hz (higher than any species known to humans). It was believed that this whale would not be heard by any of the other whales in the ocean, but now after decades of research, there is another theory that the whale’s song is heard by all other whales, as it stands out with its uniqueness. In awe of this natural wonder, Buckle wanted to give us a different perspective of the whale, turning her into an interdimensional traveler, who has lost contact with her home planet. The whale calls and calls for companionship, as she drifts further away.


Source of text.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 25, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack, Music, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, Space Travel, United Kingdom

The Sunken City of Shicheng



What many believe to be a mystery isn't actually so mysterious. Lion City, famed for sitting at the bottom of the Qiandao Lake, has a surprising history. The once thriving city, known for its powerful statue throughout all of China, now resides over 100 feet below the lake's surface. This was not due to a natural disaster or any type of destructive force unless you consider human nature to be one. The ancient city met its watery fate due to the hands of humans, specifically those who gave up the land the city once sat on to make way for modern machinery.

While there are many details surrounding the reasoning for this -- much of which we'll get into later on -- there's no denying that the fact that this city is fully preserved is a modern miracle. Although it sits deep under the water, all of its structures, statues, memorials, and archways all sit in perfect stature. Its rediscovery happened almost two decades ago and since then, divers have been repeatedly making trips below the surface to see what new aspects of the city they can explore. Inside these preserved walls lie the tale of several powerful dynasties, an ancient way of life, and some of the most stunning architectural features that are so indicative of China's history.


Full story with more pictures.

Daily Mail coverage.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Jan 28, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Architecture, History, Archaeology, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1950s, Asia

When Belgium Invaded England



Very good long article here.

Tip of the hat to pal Peter Danssaert.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Dec 22, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Government, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, War, Reader Recommendation, 1960s, Europe, United Kingdom

Perry Submarines

Hobbyist submarines are pretty oddball. (Not even getting into the territory of drug-smugglers with homemade subs.) Here's a forerunner from 1962.

Apparently the company is still going strong. Although they don't make subs anymore.



The restoration of one sub.



Posted By: Paul - Mon Sep 07, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Daredevils, Stuntpeople and Thrillseekers, Hobbies and DIY, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1960s

Sea Mail


Posted By: Paul - Sun Aug 30, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Communications, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, Regionalism, Europe

Pronouncing the Scientific Names of Seashells of North America



You can download the MP3 files here. Note: clicking the link does not initiate the download. You choose to do so at the new page.

R. Tucker Abbott begins with a statement sure to dissuade us from listening further. "Actually, there are no official correct pronunciations of these Latin names..."

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jul 28, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Boredom, Languages, Nature, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1960s

Nuke-Powered Commercial Shipping

As we know, this scheme detailed in NEW SCIENTIST never came to completion. But are there, or have there been, other, non-military nuke-powered surface vessels?

Yes, a few.



Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 13, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1950s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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