Category:
Fashion

Square Pants

Patented in 1970 by Harold Koenig of Miami, Florida.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jul 05, 2020 - Comments (5)
Category: Fashion, 1970s

The First Nylon Fair at The Albert Hall (1956)



Posted By: Paul - Wed Jun 17, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Fashion, 1950s

Game Skirts

Source: Life - Oct 19, 1953





Posted By: Alex - Thu Jun 04, 2020 - Comments (8)
Category: Fashion, Games, 1950s

Medicated Under Vest

Not only a medical miracle but a fashion statement as well.

"has proven itself to be the very Perfection of Prevention from Pneumonia…. keeping the skin in a most delicious and healthy glow and the internal organs in that healthy and vigorous condition which is the Only Safeguard Against Disease."

Harper's Magazine - May 1886

Posted By: Alex - Fri May 01, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Fashion, Underwear, Health, Disease, Nineteenth Century

Informative Swimwear

In 2005, Robert Dickey and Ruth Stephens filed a patent application for "swimwear as information device." Their idea was to make a line of swimwear that displayed maritime signal flags. This would allow people to communicate messages to those around them via their swimwear. They explained:

By using the appropriate international Signal flag or combination of international signal flags, different meanings can be communicated depending on the intentions of the wearer. For example, and individual could be wearing a covering garment (e.g. a jacket or Sweatshirt or the like) that prominently displays the international Signal flag "X-Ray', communicating the message "Stop carrying out your intentions and watch for my signals'. When the wearer sees someone with whom he or she would like to communicate with, the covering garment could be removed, revealing another article of apparel (e.g. a Swimsuit) displaying a Second international Signal flag "Kilo', communicating the message "I wish to communicate with you'.

The possible messages one could send seemed limitless, but they were never granted a patent. Perhaps the idea of messages on clothing was deemed too obvious.

There's also the limitation that only people conversant with maritime signal flags could decode the messages, which would make the various 'stay away' messages somewhat pointless.





Posted By: Alex - Sun Apr 26, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Boats, Fashion, Inventions, Languages, Double Entendres and Nudge-Nudge, Wink-Wink

Six Minutes of Disco Dancing

So much polyester. So many fly ladies. So many dudes in jumpsuits. So many funky moves.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Apr 19, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Fashion, Music, 1970s, Dance

Chi Pants

Chi pants promised to allow your Chi energy to flow better. They were created by Laurence Ostrow of Santa Cruz, CA in the 1980s. Their distinguishing feature was a "gusset crotch," which was a patch of material under the crotch instead of the usual cross-seam construction.

But for $5 extra, you could also make them "crystal powered." The Chi Pants catalog explained, "We sew a very small, perfect crystal in the back seam of your pant, right above the base of the spine. You won’t feel the crystal; you’ll just feel the energy."

Ostrow said, "We’ve had a very good response from people who have (crystals) in their pants. They feel a certain bubbling, tingling sensation up the spine. It’s not just a big lump in your pants."

Apparently the Chi Pants sold well and had a loyal fan base. But ultimately the company went under, even though Ostrow made several attempts to revive it.



Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 09, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Fashion, 1980s

The collar saw of Carl Kusch

Carl Kusch of Germany invented a way that a person would never be without a saw when they needed one, because the saw could be worn around their neck at all times. From his 1909 patent:

This invention relates to a saw which can be worn on the dress or on the person and is also provided with a frame adapted to serve as a guard.
The invention consists in a flexible saw frame convertible at any time by suitable means into a rigid frame and which is so constructed that the saw blade can be put into the frame in the known manner, when the saw is used as a tool, or be fixed to the flat side of the frame when the frame is used as a guard. In the latter case the frame of the saw protects the dress or the body from contact with the saw blade.



Kusch evidently had high hopes for his invention, because he obtained patents for it in the United States, Great Britain, France, Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. Although in his patent he never explained who he thought was going to buy the thing. The military, I'm guessing, because it seems designed to be part of a German soldier's uniform. Although as far as I know, no army ever outfitted its soldiers with this thing.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Mar 22, 2020 - Comments (7)
Category: Fashion, Inventions, Military, 1900s

Follies of the Madmen #469

Why the dog?



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Mar 12, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Fashion, Dogs, 1960s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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