Category:
Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages

Using Coca-Cola to dissolve phytobezoars

Coca-Cola isn’t just for drinking. It also has a medical use: to dissolve gastric phytobezoars (masses of indigestible material in the gastrointestinal system). Doctors administer the Coca-Cola via a tube threaded through the nose down into the intestines. As noted in a 2015 article in the World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, "An administration of Coca-Cola® is believed to be the primary choice for phytobezoar treatment because it is safe, inexpensive, and effective."

The same article further explains:

Although the mechanism has not been fully elucidated, it has been speculated that some ingredients in Coca-Cola® play a key role in bezoar dissolution. Such hypotheses include enhanced bezoar digestion by the mucolytic effect of sodium bicarbonate and/or by the acidifying effect of carbonic acid and phosphoric acid. Destruction of the bezoar may also be assisted by the carbon dioxide bubbles, which penetrate into the bezoar through the microscopic pores on its surface. Diet Coke®, Coca-Cola Light®, and Coca-Cola Zero® all contain these ingredients. Since the clinical success of bezoar dissolution by Diet Coke®, Coca-Cola Light®, and Coca-Cola Zero® was documented in previous reports, several authors have speculated that these sugar-free beverages have the same effect of bezoar dissolution as the regular version of Coca-Cola®.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jun 26, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Medicine, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages

Nutrimato

According to wikipedia:

a drink made primarily of reconstituted tomato juice concentrate and seasoned beef broth, with added vitamins and iron. Nutrimato was produced beginning in 1972 by the Duffy-Mott company in California and discontinued in 1975.

Nutrimato would have been a good name for a robot. Not so much for a juice drink.

Green Bay Press Gazette - Nov 8, 1972

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 05, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, Vegetables, 1970s

Follies of the Madmen #393

Our soft drink is equivalent to a life-endangering catastrophic event.





Source of B&W ad here (scroll right).

Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 03, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Disasters, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1960s, Weather

Follies of the Madmen #388



Dress so as to resemble a soda can.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 08, 2018 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Advertising, Fashion, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1970s

Follies of the Madmen #382



Associating your product, even in jest, with reviled aristocrats: not the smartest move.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Sep 11, 2018 - Comments (7)
Category: Business, Advertising, Royalty, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #376



A quick hit of sugar at bedtime will send those kiddies straight to slumberland!

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 25, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Children, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1930s

With real lemon juice!

In 1982, the Maryland Poison Center reported almost 80 cases of people who had suffered nausea and diarrhea after drinking Sunlight dishwashing liquid. They had received free bottles of the stuff in the mail as part of a promotional campaign. The source of the confusion was a picture of lemons on the label as well as the phrase "with real lemon juice." This led many to conclude that the bottle contained some kind of lemonade. Or a lemon-flavored drink mixer. A lot of people added it to iced tea.

A spokesman for Lever Brothers, the manufacturer of the product, noted that the bottles also clearly said, "Sunlight dishwashing liquid."

Sunlight no longer uses the phrase "with real lemon juice." Apparently they learned their lesson. But they've still got a picture of a lemon on their bottles.

Muncie Evening Press - July 15, 1982



Indianapolis Star - July 15, 1982



The bottle that caused the confusion



More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jan 20, 2018 - Comments (6)
Category: Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1980s

Make milk a social drink

1960: The dairy industry, noting that coffee, tea, beer, liquor, and soft drinks are traditionally served at parties but milk isn't, started plotting ways to make milk a "social drink."

If you add alcohol to milk it could be considered a social drink. Otherwise, I'd say their campaign fizzled.

Akron Beacon Journal - Dec 4, 1960



Port Angeles Evening News - Mar 9, 1960

Posted By: Alex - Sat Nov 26, 2016 - Comments (4)
Category: Food, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, 1960s

Its The Real Thing


Some think of a pool full of Coca Cola and Mentos and say, "Why?" These guys said, "Why not!"

Posted By: patty - Tue Jun 28, 2016 - Comments (8)
Category: Drones, Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Candy, Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages, Nausea, Revulsion and Disgust

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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