Category:
1920s

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 28



Tatiana Glebova, 1927.

In "Prision," of which there is a preparatory drawing, the painter depicts a world of multiple orientations through diverse interconnected viewpoints, and shows various heads with their musculature visible as if to reveal to us their interminable growth process. Glebova devoutly believed Filonov’s theories on the “universal flowering” and, like him, held that painting should reflect a growth process of the world similar to that of plants, according to which it was permanently active as an independent being.


Source of text.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Aug 27, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Body Modifications, 1920s, Russia

Keep the mouth glands active

"unless we watch out, the mouth glands slow up and decay sets in. The formula to correct this was worked out in Pebeco Tooth Paste."

San Francisco Examiner - Aug 21, 1927

Posted By: Alex - Mon Aug 24, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Hygiene, Advertising, 1920s, Teeth

Queen Mary’s Dollhouse

Queen Mary's Dolls' House is the largest, most beautiful and most famous dolls' house in the world. Built between 1921 and 1924 for Queen Mary, consort of George V, by the leading British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, it includes contributions from over 1,500 of the finest artists, craftsmen and manufacturers of the early twentieth century. From life below stairs to the high-society setting of the saloon and dining room, and from a library bursting with original works by the top literary names of the day, to a fully stocked wine cellar and a garden, created by Gertrude Jekyll, no detail was forgotten. The house even includes electricity, running hot and cold water and working lifts. Each room is fully furnished and waiting to be explored.





The official homepage.

Article on the library therein.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 10, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Domestic, Enlargements, Miniatures, and Other Matters of Scale, Royalty, 1920s, United Kingdom

Are our feet turning to hoofs?

Source: Illustrated World - Apr 1920

Something to worry about, if you have nothing else at all in your life to worry about.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Aug 06, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: 1920s, Feet

National Association for the Improvement of the Appearance of Hogs

I suspect the National Association for the Improvement of the Appearance of Hogs had only one member.

Legislators gathering here for the opening of the 19th session Tuesday have received word that a representative of the National Association for the Improvement of the Appearance of Hogs will seek to advise them during the session. In all apparent seriousness the writer urges that the appearance of swine should be uniform and artistic, not only that they might be less offensive to the eye but that the bristles might have a better sale.

Argus Leader - Jan 5, 1925

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jul 25, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, 1920s

The strange death of Frank Hayes

June 4, 1923: Jockey Frank Hayes suffered a heart attack and died while riding the horse Sweet Kiss in the steeplechase at Belmont Park. He nevertheless won the race.

It's the only time that a horse race has been won by a dead jockey. And it's probably also the only time that a sports competition has been won by a dead contestant.

More info: wikipedia

St. Louis Post-Dispatch - June 5, 1923

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jul 09, 2020 - Comments (7)
Category: Death, Sports, 1920s

Wolf eats man’s face

The photo below captures the moment a wolf started to attack the face of its trainer, Jacques Suzanne, during the filming of a movie. The camera crew, thinking the attack was part of the stunt, kept on filming.

Suzanne evidently wasn't badly hurt, though the wolf was killed. Apparently he was the kind of guy who knew how to defend himself against a wolf. Read more about him in Adirondack Life magazine.

Chicago Tribune - Feb 20, 1927

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 23, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Dogs, 1920s

Man-Catching Tank

Stanley Valinski's "man-catching tank," for which he received a patent in 1921 (#1,392,095), looked a bit like a dalek prototype.

He imagined it would be used in banks for catching and holding burglars. It consisted of an armored watchbox concealing an armed watchman who could peer out through peep holes. The entire device moved on electric-driven wheels, which the watchman could steer. Upon spotting a burglar, he would maneuver the tank into position and then grasp the criminal with six enormous steel claws attached to the side of the machine.



Wichita Daily Times - Dec 18, 1921

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jun 14, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Crime, Inventions, 1920s

Sugar Doping

1924: Despite being fed sweet hot tea and peppermint creams in an experimental attempt to increase their energy, the Yale soccer team lost to the visiting team by 5 to 1.

Bridgeport Telegram - Nov 11, 1924

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jun 10, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Sports, Experiments, Junk Food, Nutrition, 1920s

Mystery Illustration 95

What type of craft was host to these scenes? Luxury railroad car perhaps? Ocean liner? What's your guess?

The answer is here.


Or after the jump.





More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jun 05, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Travel, 1920s

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