Category:
1960s

Italian Caveman Rock ‘n’ Roll

Posted By: Paul - Thu Aug 17, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Movies, Music, 1960s

Infraphone

The Infraphone, invented by Douglas Reddan circa 1960, used infrared light to allow people to communicate wirelessly at distances of several hundred yards. You had to aim your infraphone at another infraphone, which you did by looking through a sight on top of the unit. Then you could talk into the device, just like using a phone.

It's an interesting idea, but I can't really think of a situation when this would provide an advantage over using a radio walkie talkie. Maybe because the signal can't be intercepted as easily? But then there's the awkwardness of having to aim the device. Articles about it frequently suggested it could be used as a wireless intercom.

Eugene Guard - Nov 14, 1960



Palm Beach Post - June 4, 1961



Popular electronics - Feb 1961 (via RF Cafe)

Posted By: Alex - Sat Aug 12, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions, Telephones, 1960s

The Beachcomber Bar, UK



Anglo Hula: less is not more.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Aug 11, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, 1960s, Dance, Parody, Europe, South Pacific

JFK as Angel




Source of text.


Regretably, the only image I could find has this watermark hiding some of the details.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 09, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Religion, Statues and Monuments, 1930s, 1960s, Europe

The Snobs and The Upper Crust





You can't keep a good idea down.

The Upper Crust.


Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 02, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Music, 1960s, Parody

Egg Massage

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 29, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, 1960s, Europe

Conditioning experiment on Soviet child

I ran across these intriguing images in an old copy of Newsweek - March 28, 1960.





Unfortunately there wasn't much explanation about them. The caption read: "Psychological sputnik: Year-old Soviet child rigged for conditioning experiment."

An accompanying article, about the visit of Soviet psychologist Alexander R. Luria to the U.S., didn't refer to the images at all. But offered this hint:

[Luria] maintained that there was little battle fatigue among Russian soldiers in World War II because they had a "purpose." As for the civilian population today: "We have much less neurosis than you have. Every man in our country has an important goal, the 'we'."
Luria's own goal and the goal of Soviet psychopedagogy, is important, too: Increasing the learning ability of Soviet children by 25 per cent.
"Think of it," he said, "such a finding would be worth billions of dollars. It is no less important than a sputnik."

So the images must be showing some kind of weird Soviet experiment to boost a child's IQ.

The kid would be too young to be Putin. Though there is a slight resemblance.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jul 27, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Psychology, 1960s

Moon Cheeze

July 20 was the anniversary of Neil Armstrong landing on the moon. Back in 1969, the Fisher cheese company, located in Armstrong's home town of Wapakoneta, Ohio, capitalized on that achievement by coming out with "Moon Cheeze." It seems to have been just regular American cheddar cheese. Only the packaging was special. It came in a container shaped like the state of Ohio. Apparently it was so popular that they kept making it for years.



image source



Palladium-Item - Jan 19, 1969



Pensacola News Journal - July 18, 1969



Bonus: Armstrong making pizza in 1969. That looks like mozzarella, not Moon Cheeze.

via I have seen the whole Internet

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jul 21, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Food, Spaceflight, Astronautics, and Astronomy, 1960s

The Maid of Cotton Pageant

Continuing our intermittent look at oddball beauty pageants.

The Maid of Cotton pageant began in 1939. The annual pageant was sponsored by the National Cotton Council (NCC), Memphis Cotton Carnival, and the Cotton Exchanges of Memphis, New York, and New Orleans. The pageant was held in Memphis, Tennessee, in conjunction with the Carnival until the 1980s.

In mid-December every year the NCC released a list of contestants. Contestants were required to have been born in one of the cotton-producing states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North and South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas or Virginia. They might have also been born in the cotton-producing counties of Alexander, Jefferson, Massac, Pulaski, Williamson or Madison, Illinois or in Clark or Nye counties of Nevada. There were usually twenty contestants each year.

Contestants were judged on personality, good manners, intelligence, and family background as well as beauty and an ability to model. A Top Ten were chosen and then a Top Five, and finally second and first runners up and a winner. Winners served as goodwill and fashion ambassadors of the cotton industry in a five-month, all-expense tour of American cities. In the mid-1950s the tour expanded globally. In the late 1950s a Little Miss Cotton pageant was begun but lasted only until 1963 before being discontinued. In the mid-1980s Dallas,Texas took over the pageant, in conjunction with the NCC and its overseas division, Cotton Council International. In 1986, to bolster interest and participation, the NCC eliminated the rule requiring contestants to be born in a cotton-producing state. The pageant was discontinued in 1993, one of the reasons being that Cotton Inc. stopped contributing scholarship money as well as waning public interest and changing marketing strategies.


More details here.

And also here.

The 1952 winner.

Source.



Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 21, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Contests, Races and Other Competitions, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s

La Bostella







Original article here.


Posted By: Paul - Tue Jul 18, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Fads, 1960s, Dance

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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