Category:
Human Marvels

No-Arms Golfer


Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 12, 2015 - Comments (3)
Category: Body Modifications, Human Marvels, Sports, 1930s

Snake Woman

Posted By: Paul - Sun Mar 29, 2015 - Comments (5)
Category: Body, Human Marvels, Africa

Norris Kellam, the Human Cork

Norris Kellam's great talent in life was floating. For which he earned the name "The Human Cork." In May 1933 he attempted to break the world record for staying afloat by floating in a saltwater pool in Norfolk, Virginia for over 86 hours. Unfortunately he didn't make it. After 71 hours and 19 minutes he was overcome by sharp cramps and sunburn and had to climb out of the pool.

There's more about Kellam at hamptonroads.com. The images are from the Norfolk Public Library.



Posted By: Alex - Fri Oct 17, 2014 - Comments (7)
Category: Human Marvels, Sports, World Records, 1930s

The Human Bellows

Not much info seems to remain about Art Hubell and his sideshow act. Except for this one picture. I wonder how he discovered he had this talent. [via Flickr]

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jan 24, 2014 - Comments (7)
Category: Human Marvels

Strongest Hair Ever

Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 28, 2013 - Comments (3)
Category: Human Marvels, Air Travel and Airlines, 1930s, Hair and Hairstyling

Crazy Pygmy—Hilarious Dancing



What day is not brightened by the inexplicable and thoughtlessly ridiculed antics of a small person?

Posted By: Paul - Fri Nov 01, 2013 - Comments (2)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Ethnic Groupings, Human Marvels, 1930s, Dance

The Torture King

I haven't been able to find much information about R.H. "Skeets" Hubbard, except that he was a sideshow performer in the 1950s, whose talents included driving an eight-inch spike into his head, and pulling a wagon with his eyelids. He was sometimes called "The Torture King," "The Human Plank," or "The Human Blockhead." Tough way to make a living.





Posted By: Alex - Sat Sep 28, 2013 - Comments (3)
Category: Human Marvels, 1950s

Gogea Mitu


When I first saw the cover of this March 1935 issue of the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, I thought the photo must be fake. But no, it's real. It shows 20-year-old Gogea Mitu, a boxer and the tallest Romanian in history. From wikipedia:

Mitu became world famous because of his enormous stature, at the age of 20 he was 2.42 metres (7.9 ft) tall, had a weight of 183 kilograms (400 lb) and had a foot size of 38 centimetres (15 in). Because of these characteristics he was very sought after by doctors and scientists who wanted to know the reason for his gigantism and by people who wanted to profit from his stature.

Mitu only lived to be 22, dying of tuberculosis in 1936. In the picture, it looks like he's wearing Converse sneakers. Did they come in his size, or were they custom-made for him?

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jun 24, 2013 - Comments (7)
Category: Human Marvels, 1930s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Chuck Shepherd
Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

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