Category:
Architecture

Funkalicious House

I just love this house. It's like Dr. Seuss meets Willy Wonka. Designed by architect Javier Senosiain, from Mexico, the home is named "Nautilus House" and was built in 2006 in Naucalpan. I think it's a stunning building, both inside and out, but you be judge.

Posted By: Nethie - Mon Dec 28, 2009 - Comments (4)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Interior Decorating, Landscaping

The Great Wall of Africa?

Problem: Desertification (when viable land is encroached upon by desert) threatens the lives of millions of people in Africa. Solution: Build a wall to keep the desert from spreading. According to architect Magnus Larson, it is not as difficult as you might imagine. Take sand dunes at the edge of the desert, combine them with a mixture of water and bacteria, let dry and you've got an instant sandstone wall! Read all about it at BBC news.

Posted By: fyshstyxx - Tue Jul 28, 2009 - Comments (5)
Category: Architecture, Disasters, Science, Africa

But Where Did They Get The Concrete?

The historic city of Bath in England is famed for both the Roman spas that gave the town its name, and for the wonderful architecture of the Georgian houses that were later built to take advantage of them. These homes were all the more beautiful for being built from "Bath stone", a richly honey-coloured limestone that was quarried from mines in nearby Combe Down, now a thriving suburb of the City of Bath. And therein lies the problem. The limestone mines have been abandoned for over a century, and the Georgian miners were none too careful to begin with, meaning that much of the 9 miles of mineshafts are unstable, and some are barely 6 feet below the surface. With over 700 homes at risk of disappearing into the ground with no warning, the local North-East Somerset Council has spent £160 million ($260 million) stabilising the mines and filling them in again with concrete foam in a 10 year project that comes to an end today (BBC News).

Posted By: Dumbfounded - Tue Jul 07, 2009 - Comments (4)
Category: Architecture, History, Goofs and Screw-ups

Inventions of Buckminster Fuller, Part 6: Geodesic Domes

This is one of Bucky's inventions that actually went into practical use. Also, many people are actually somewhat familiar with this one (think Spaceship Earth at Epcot).
image


More in extended >>

Posted By: fyshstyxx - Tue Jun 16, 2009 - Comments (6)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Futurism

Inventions of Buckminster Fuller, Part 4: The Dymaxion Bathroom

This was the finishing touch to Fuller's Dymaxion House.
image

More in extended >>

Posted By: fyshstyxx - Wed Jun 03, 2009 - Comments (3)
Category: Architecture, Bathrooms, Futurism, Inventions

Inventions of Buckminster Fuller, Part 2: The Dymaxion House

Problem: Quality housing is too expensive for the average person.
Answer: The Dymaxion House!
image

More in extended >>

Posted By: fyshstyxx - Tue May 19, 2009 - Comments (8)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Futurism

Weird Florida, part 1: Carrabelle

Carrabelle is a small town about 20 miles from Apalachicola. It is also home to the world's smallest police station
image

More in extended >>

Posted By: fyshstyxx - Mon May 18, 2009 - Comments (7)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Communications, Cops, Sightseeing

Murals That Move

Murals are usually large works of art or paintings used to hide an unsightly wall. But Artist Rufus B. Seder has taken murals to the next level. His Lifetile murals are "movies for a wall". Lifetiles don't use electricity, moving parts or tricky lighting. They are optical illusions, with flair. You can read more about Lifetiles, but I recommend watching the video.

Posted By: Nethie - Fri May 15, 2009 - Comments (4)
Category: Architecture, Art, Inventions

Buy Your Own Piece of Armageddon

Be the envy of every other survivalist and have your own converted cold-war Atlas-F missile silo home! You too can live in complete cold war safety and luxury. The converted missile launch site is marketed as a getaway, luxury home, and in my opinion is every survivalist’s dream. The property includes its own private runway, 2000 square foot luxury home above ground with master suite, a private airstrip, and a hangar/garage. Below ground, past the 2000 lb. blast doors and three feet of reinforced concrete built to withstand brutal missile assaults lies two additional stories of space in the converted control room where you will find two additional suites with luxury marble Jacuzzi baths and an escape hatch to your private hangar.

image


More in extended >>

Posted By: chris_cantwell - Wed May 06, 2009 - Comments (5)
Category: Architecture, Armageddon and Apocalypses, Buildings and Other Structures, Destruction, Flight, Government, Military, Real Estate, Science, War, 1950s

Page 5 of 6 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 > 




weird universe thumbnail
Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Contact Us
Monthly Archives
April 2020 •  March 2020 •  February 2020 •  January 2020

December 2019 •  November 2019 •  October 2019 •  September 2019 •  August 2019 •  July 2019 •  June 2019 •  May 2019 •  April 2019 •  March 2019 •  February 2019 •  January 2019

December 2018 •  November 2018 •  October 2018 •  September 2018 •  August 2018 •  July 2018 •  June 2018 •  May 2018 •  April 2018 •  March 2018 •  February 2018 •  January 2018

December 2017 •  November 2017 •  October 2017 •  September 2017 •  August 2017 •  July 2017 •  June 2017 •  May 2017 •  April 2017 •  March 2017 •  February 2017 •  January 2017

December 2016 •  November 2016 •  October 2016 •  September 2016 •  August 2016 •  July 2016 •  June 2016 •  May 2016 •  April 2016 •  March 2016 •  February 2016 •  January 2016

December 2015 •  November 2015 •  October 2015 •  September 2015 •  August 2015 •  July 2015 •  June 2015 •  May 2015 •  April 2015 •  March 2015 •  February 2015 •  January 2015

December 2014 •  November 2014 •  October 2014 •  September 2014 •  August 2014 •  July 2014 •  June 2014 •  May 2014 •  April 2014 •  March 2014 •  February 2014 •  January 2014

December 2013 •  November 2013 •  October 2013 •  September 2013 •  August 2013 •  July 2013 •  June 2013 •  May 2013 •  April 2013 •  March 2013 •  February 2013 •  January 2013

December 2012 •  November 2012 •  October 2012 •  September 2012 •  August 2012 •  July 2012 •  June 2012 •  May 2012 •  April 2012 •  March 2012 •  February 2012 •  January 2012

December 2011 •  November 2011 •  October 2011 •  September 2011 •  August 2011 •  July 2011 •  June 2011 •  May 2011 •  April 2011 •  March 2011 •  February 2011 •  January 2011

December 2010 •  November 2010 •  October 2010 •  September 2010 •  August 2010 •  July 2010 •  June 2010 •  May 2010 •  April 2010 •  March 2010 •  February 2010 •  January 2010

December 2009 •  November 2009 •  October 2009 •  September 2009 •  August 2009 •  July 2009 •  June 2009 •  May 2009 •  April 2009 •  March 2009 •  February 2009 •  January 2009

December 2008 •  November 2008 •  October 2008 •  September 2008 •  August 2008 •  July 2008 •